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An unusual cause of epigastric pain: a fishbone stuck in the duodenum.

Yilmaz B, Aktas B, Yılmaz B, Ozmete S, Ekiz F - Prz Gastroenterol (2016)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

No MeSH data available.


Endoscopic image of fishbone stuck in the second part of the duodenum
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Figure 0001: Endoscopic image of fishbone stuck in the second part of the duodenum

Mentions: A 56-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain for 5 days after eating fish. She had no history of any disease or medication. Her vital signs were normal. On examination, the epigastric region was tender. No abnormalities were found in the laboratory tests. Abdominal ultrasonography was normal. Endoscopy showed a fishbone stuck in second part of the duodenum (Figure 1). The oesophagus and stomach were unremarkable. Approximately 2 cm in length, the fishbone was removed using standard grasping forceps. The patient's pain dramatically improved immediately after removing the fishbone and she was stable in follow up.


An unusual cause of epigastric pain: a fishbone stuck in the duodenum.

Yilmaz B, Aktas B, Yılmaz B, Ozmete S, Ekiz F - Prz Gastroenterol (2016)

Endoscopic image of fishbone stuck in the second part of the duodenum
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814544&req=5

Figure 0001: Endoscopic image of fishbone stuck in the second part of the duodenum
Mentions: A 56-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain for 5 days after eating fish. She had no history of any disease or medication. Her vital signs were normal. On examination, the epigastric region was tender. No abnormalities were found in the laboratory tests. Abdominal ultrasonography was normal. Endoscopy showed a fishbone stuck in second part of the duodenum (Figure 1). The oesophagus and stomach were unremarkable. Approximately 2 cm in length, the fishbone was removed using standard grasping forceps. The patient's pain dramatically improved immediately after removing the fishbone and she was stable in follow up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

No MeSH data available.