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Concentrations of cadmium and selected essential elements in malignant large intestine tissue.

Klimczak M, Dziki A, Kilanowicz A, Sapota A, Duda-Szymańska J, Daragó A - Prz Gastroenterol (2015)

Bottom Line: The levels of copper, selenium, and magnesium were higher in the malignant than in normal tissues.In addition, the zinc/copper and calcium/magnesium relationship was altered in malignant tissue, where correlations were lower compared to non-malignant tissue.The results seems to demonstrate disturbed homeostasis of some essential elements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Toxicology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Incidence rates of large intestine cancer indicate a role of environmental and occupational factors. The role of essential elements and their interaction with toxic metals can contribute to the explanation of a complex mechanism by which large intestine cancer develops. Bearing this in mind, determining the levels of essential and toxic elements in tissues (organs), as well as in body fluids, seems to shed light on their role in the mode of action in malignant disease.

Aim: Determination of the levels of cadmium, zinc, copper, selenium, calcium, magnesium, and iron in large intestine malignant tissue.

Material and methods: Two intraoperative intestine sections were investigated: one from the malignant tissue and the other one from the normal tissue, collected from each person with diagnosed large intestine cancer. Cadmium, zinc, copper, calcium, magnesium, and iron levels were determined with atomic absorption spectrometry, and selenium levels by spectrofluorimetric method.

Results: The levels of copper, selenium, and magnesium were higher in the malignant than in normal tissues. In addition, the zinc/copper and calcium/magnesium relationship was altered in malignant tissue, where correlations were lower compared to non-malignant tissue.

Conclusions: The results seems to demonstrate disturbed homeostasis of some essential elements. However, it is hard to confirm their involvement in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations in normal (A) and malignant (B) tissues of large intestine
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Figure 0002: Correlation between calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations in normal (A) and malignant (B) tissues of large intestine

Mentions: The determined values of elements were also analysed in terms of their interrelations and correlations. On the basis of adequate calculations, a high correlation (almost 1) was observed between Zn and Cu concentrations in the normal tissue, but it was disturbed in the malignant tissue, where it was much lower (Figure 1). Similarly large differences between correlations were noted between Ca and Mg concentrations. Although the correlation between these elements in normal tissue was moderate; in the malignant tissue there seemed to be no relationship at all (Figure 2).


Concentrations of cadmium and selected essential elements in malignant large intestine tissue.

Klimczak M, Dziki A, Kilanowicz A, Sapota A, Duda-Szymańska J, Daragó A - Prz Gastroenterol (2015)

Correlation between calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations in normal (A) and malignant (B) tissues of large intestine
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814536&req=5

Figure 0002: Correlation between calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations in normal (A) and malignant (B) tissues of large intestine
Mentions: The determined values of elements were also analysed in terms of their interrelations and correlations. On the basis of adequate calculations, a high correlation (almost 1) was observed between Zn and Cu concentrations in the normal tissue, but it was disturbed in the malignant tissue, where it was much lower (Figure 1). Similarly large differences between correlations were noted between Ca and Mg concentrations. Although the correlation between these elements in normal tissue was moderate; in the malignant tissue there seemed to be no relationship at all (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The levels of copper, selenium, and magnesium were higher in the malignant than in normal tissues.In addition, the zinc/copper and calcium/magnesium relationship was altered in malignant tissue, where correlations were lower compared to non-malignant tissue.The results seems to demonstrate disturbed homeostasis of some essential elements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Toxicology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Incidence rates of large intestine cancer indicate a role of environmental and occupational factors. The role of essential elements and their interaction with toxic metals can contribute to the explanation of a complex mechanism by which large intestine cancer develops. Bearing this in mind, determining the levels of essential and toxic elements in tissues (organs), as well as in body fluids, seems to shed light on their role in the mode of action in malignant disease.

Aim: Determination of the levels of cadmium, zinc, copper, selenium, calcium, magnesium, and iron in large intestine malignant tissue.

Material and methods: Two intraoperative intestine sections were investigated: one from the malignant tissue and the other one from the normal tissue, collected from each person with diagnosed large intestine cancer. Cadmium, zinc, copper, calcium, magnesium, and iron levels were determined with atomic absorption spectrometry, and selenium levels by spectrofluorimetric method.

Results: The levels of copper, selenium, and magnesium were higher in the malignant than in normal tissues. In addition, the zinc/copper and calcium/magnesium relationship was altered in malignant tissue, where correlations were lower compared to non-malignant tissue.

Conclusions: The results seems to demonstrate disturbed homeostasis of some essential elements. However, it is hard to confirm their involvement in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus