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Survival and Growth of Epiphytic Ferns Depend on Resource Sharing.

Lu HZ, Song L, Liu WY, Xu XL, Hu YH, Shi XM, Li S, Ma WZ, Chang YF, Fan ZX, Lu SG, Wu Y, Yu FH - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments.However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species.We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of SciencesMengla, China; University of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing) on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets) and another on groups (several ramets within a plot), with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration) on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium) in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of rhizome severing on (A) ramet number, (B) biomass, (C) Fv/Fm, (D–F) and frond morphology of the two epiphytic ferns in the group experiment. Error bars represent SEs.
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Figure 2: Effects of rhizome severing on (A) ramet number, (B) biomass, (C) Fv/Fm, (D–F) and frond morphology of the two epiphytic ferns in the group experiment. Error bars represent SEs.

Mentions: In the group experiment, rhizome severing significantly reduced number of ramets, total biomass and belowground biomass of both epiphytes, and such effects did not depend on species (no Se × Sp interaction; Table 3; Figures 2A,B). Rhizome severing did not significantly affect Fv/Fm, frond length, width or thickness of either species (Table 3; Figures 2C–F). Species significantly affected aboveground and belowground biomass, Fv/Fm, frond length, width and thickness (Table 3; Figure 2).


Survival and Growth of Epiphytic Ferns Depend on Resource Sharing.

Lu HZ, Song L, Liu WY, Xu XL, Hu YH, Shi XM, Li S, Ma WZ, Chang YF, Fan ZX, Lu SG, Wu Y, Yu FH - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Effects of rhizome severing on (A) ramet number, (B) biomass, (C) Fv/Fm, (D–F) and frond morphology of the two epiphytic ferns in the group experiment. Error bars represent SEs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814527&req=5

Figure 2: Effects of rhizome severing on (A) ramet number, (B) biomass, (C) Fv/Fm, (D–F) and frond morphology of the two epiphytic ferns in the group experiment. Error bars represent SEs.
Mentions: In the group experiment, rhizome severing significantly reduced number of ramets, total biomass and belowground biomass of both epiphytes, and such effects did not depend on species (no Se × Sp interaction; Table 3; Figures 2A,B). Rhizome severing did not significantly affect Fv/Fm, frond length, width or thickness of either species (Table 3; Figures 2C–F). Species significantly affected aboveground and belowground biomass, Fv/Fm, frond length, width and thickness (Table 3; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments.However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species.We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of SciencesMengla, China; University of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing) on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets) and another on groups (several ramets within a plot), with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration) on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium) in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

No MeSH data available.