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Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step.

Zaqout S, Kaindl AM - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Bottom Line: Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo.Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating.Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlin, Germany; Center for Chronically Sick Children (Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, SPZ), Charité - Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Impregnation step. The brain sample is kept in Golgi-Cox solution at room temperature in the dark (A). After 24 h, the sample is transferred into a new Golgi solution-containing bottle with the help of a histological cassette as shown in the serial pictures (B–E) and kept to settle at room temperature in dark for 7–10 days.
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Figure 1: Impregnation step. The brain sample is kept in Golgi-Cox solution at room temperature in the dark (A). After 24 h, the sample is transferred into a new Golgi solution-containing bottle with the help of a histological cassette as shown in the serial pictures (B–E) and kept to settle at room temperature in dark for 7–10 days.

Mentions: After cervical dislocation, the brain is dissected quickly but carefully, washed with dd-H2O, and cut into two halves to allow better impregnation. Each half is then transferred into an individual small bottle with Golgi-Cox solution (Figure 1A) and stored at room temperature in dark. Fixation or perfusion with 4% PFA of adult brains should be avoided because this leads to over-impregnated neurons rendering a study of neuronal arborization impossible. After 24 h, each brain sample is transferred into a new small bottle of Golgi-Cox solution using plastic forceps or preferably by pouring the solution and sample into histological cassettes (Rotilabo® embedding cassettes; K114.1, Carl Roth GmbH, Germany) as shown in Figures 1B–E. The small bottles are kept at room temperature in the dark for 7–10 days.


Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step.

Zaqout S, Kaindl AM - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Impregnation step. The brain sample is kept in Golgi-Cox solution at room temperature in the dark (A). After 24 h, the sample is transferred into a new Golgi solution-containing bottle with the help of a histological cassette as shown in the serial pictures (B–E) and kept to settle at room temperature in dark for 7–10 days.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814522&req=5

Figure 1: Impregnation step. The brain sample is kept in Golgi-Cox solution at room temperature in the dark (A). After 24 h, the sample is transferred into a new Golgi solution-containing bottle with the help of a histological cassette as shown in the serial pictures (B–E) and kept to settle at room temperature in dark for 7–10 days.
Mentions: After cervical dislocation, the brain is dissected quickly but carefully, washed with dd-H2O, and cut into two halves to allow better impregnation. Each half is then transferred into an individual small bottle with Golgi-Cox solution (Figure 1A) and stored at room temperature in dark. Fixation or perfusion with 4% PFA of adult brains should be avoided because this leads to over-impregnated neurons rendering a study of neuronal arborization impossible. After 24 h, each brain sample is transferred into a new small bottle of Golgi-Cox solution using plastic forceps or preferably by pouring the solution and sample into histological cassettes (Rotilabo® embedding cassettes; K114.1, Carl Roth GmbH, Germany) as shown in Figures 1B–E. The small bottles are kept at room temperature in the dark for 7–10 days.

Bottom Line: Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo.Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating.Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlin, Germany; Center for Chronically Sick Children (Sozialpädiatrisches Zentrum, SPZ), Charité - Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus