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Proteomics As a Tool for Studying Bacterial Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance.

Pérez-Llarena FJ, Bou G - Front Microbiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world.This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens.It also reports some applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Servicio de Microbiología-INIBIC, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña A Coruña, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world. The most recent advances in this field have helped us to explore aspects beyond genomics. For example, by studying proteins and their regulation, researchers now understand how some pathogenic bacteria have adapted to the lethal actions of antibiotics. Proteomics has also advanced our knowledge of mechanisms of bacterial virulence and some important aspects of how bacteria interact with human cells and, thus, of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens. It also reports some applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future. The reported advances will enable new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to be developed in the fight against some of the most lethal bacteria affecting humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Distribution of differently expressed proteins in A. baumannii following ex vivo incubation according to functional categories. The stacked bar chart shows the number of overexpressed proteins (red) and underexpressed proteins (dark blue) in the macrophage model and the number of overexpressed proteins (yellow) and underexpressed proteins (light blue) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) model in each functional category. Obtained and adapted from Méndez et al. (2015) and reprinted with permission from the publisher. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the A. baumannii extracellular sub-proteomes. (B) Proteins from Outer Membrane Vesicle subproteome and (C) Freely soluble extracellular proteins. The total numbers of proteins within the respective group are shown in brackets. Obtained and adapted from Mendez et al. (2012) and reprinted with permission from the publisher.
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Figure 4: (A) Distribution of differently expressed proteins in A. baumannii following ex vivo incubation according to functional categories. The stacked bar chart shows the number of overexpressed proteins (red) and underexpressed proteins (dark blue) in the macrophage model and the number of overexpressed proteins (yellow) and underexpressed proteins (light blue) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) model in each functional category. Obtained and adapted from Méndez et al. (2015) and reprinted with permission from the publisher. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the A. baumannii extracellular sub-proteomes. (B) Proteins from Outer Membrane Vesicle subproteome and (C) Freely soluble extracellular proteins. The total numbers of proteins within the respective group are shown in brackets. Obtained and adapted from Mendez et al. (2012) and reprinted with permission from the publisher.

Mentions: During a very recent study with the infectious agent A. baumannii, we obtained an ex vivo protein expression profiling for pneumonia (Méndez et al., 2015). We characterized the proteome of A. baumannii in the presence of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected rats (to simulate conditions in the respiratory tract) and in the presence RAW 264.7 cells (control conditions). We observed alterations in cell wall synthesis and identified two upregulated virulence-associated proteins with >15 peptides/protein in both ex vivo models (OmpA and YjjK), which suggests that these proteins are fundamental for pathogenesis and virulence in the airways (Figure 4A).


Proteomics As a Tool for Studying Bacterial Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance.

Pérez-Llarena FJ, Bou G - Front Microbiol (2016)

(A) Distribution of differently expressed proteins in A. baumannii following ex vivo incubation according to functional categories. The stacked bar chart shows the number of overexpressed proteins (red) and underexpressed proteins (dark blue) in the macrophage model and the number of overexpressed proteins (yellow) and underexpressed proteins (light blue) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) model in each functional category. Obtained and adapted from Méndez et al. (2015) and reprinted with permission from the publisher. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the A. baumannii extracellular sub-proteomes. (B) Proteins from Outer Membrane Vesicle subproteome and (C) Freely soluble extracellular proteins. The total numbers of proteins within the respective group are shown in brackets. Obtained and adapted from Mendez et al. (2012) and reprinted with permission from the publisher.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814472&req=5

Figure 4: (A) Distribution of differently expressed proteins in A. baumannii following ex vivo incubation according to functional categories. The stacked bar chart shows the number of overexpressed proteins (red) and underexpressed proteins (dark blue) in the macrophage model and the number of overexpressed proteins (yellow) and underexpressed proteins (light blue) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) model in each functional category. Obtained and adapted from Méndez et al. (2015) and reprinted with permission from the publisher. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the A. baumannii extracellular sub-proteomes. (B) Proteins from Outer Membrane Vesicle subproteome and (C) Freely soluble extracellular proteins. The total numbers of proteins within the respective group are shown in brackets. Obtained and adapted from Mendez et al. (2012) and reprinted with permission from the publisher.
Mentions: During a very recent study with the infectious agent A. baumannii, we obtained an ex vivo protein expression profiling for pneumonia (Méndez et al., 2015). We characterized the proteome of A. baumannii in the presence of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected rats (to simulate conditions in the respiratory tract) and in the presence RAW 264.7 cells (control conditions). We observed alterations in cell wall synthesis and identified two upregulated virulence-associated proteins with >15 peptides/protein in both ex vivo models (OmpA and YjjK), which suggests that these proteins are fundamental for pathogenesis and virulence in the airways (Figure 4A).

Bottom Line: Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world.This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens.It also reports some applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Servicio de Microbiología-INIBIC, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña A Coruña, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Proteomic studies have improved our understanding of the microbial world. The most recent advances in this field have helped us to explore aspects beyond genomics. For example, by studying proteins and their regulation, researchers now understand how some pathogenic bacteria have adapted to the lethal actions of antibiotics. Proteomics has also advanced our knowledge of mechanisms of bacterial virulence and some important aspects of how bacteria interact with human cells and, thus, of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. This review article addresses these issues in some of the most important human pathogens. It also reports some applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry that may be important for the diagnosis of bacterial resistance in clinical laboratories in the future. The reported advances will enable new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to be developed in the fight against some of the most lethal bacteria affecting humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus