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Alternative Glycerol Balance Strategies among Saccharomyces Species in Response to Winemaking Stress.

Pérez-Torrado R, Oliveira BM, Zemančíková J, Sychrová H, Querol A - Front Microbiol (2016)

Bottom Line: The results show different pattern and level of expression among the different species, especially for STL1.These experiments also revealed a different functionality of the glycerol transporters among the different species studied.All these data point to different strategies to handle glycerol accumulation in response to winemaking stresses as hyperosmotic or cold-hyperosmotic stress in the different species, with variable emphasis in the production, influx, or efflux of glycerol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Biotechnology Department, Systems Biology in Yeast of Biotechnological Interest, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos, IATA-CSIC Valencia, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Production and balance of glycerol is essential for the survival of yeast cells in certain stressful conditions as hyperosmotic or cold shock that occur during industrial processes as winemaking. These stress responses are well-known in S. cerevisiae, however, little is known in other phylogenetically close related Saccharomyces species associated with natural or fermentation environments such as S. uvarum, S. paradoxus or S. kudriavzevii. In this work we have investigated the expression of four genes (GPD1, GPD2, STL1, and FPS1) crucial in the glycerol pool balance in the four species with a biotechnological potential (S. cerevisiae; S. paradoxus; S. uvarum; and S. kudriavzevii), and the ability of strains to grow under osmotic and cold stresses. The results show different pattern and level of expression among the different species, especially for STL1. We also studied the function of Stl1 glycerol symporter in the survival to osmotic changes and cell growth capacity in winemaking environments. These experiments also revealed a different functionality of the glycerol transporters among the different species studied. All these data point to different strategies to handle glycerol accumulation in response to winemaking stresses as hyperosmotic or cold-hyperosmotic stress in the different species, with variable emphasis in the production, influx, or efflux of glycerol.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Osmotolerance of S. paradoxus (S.p., Chr16.2, 108), S. cerevisiae (S.c. FCry, T73), S. kudriavzevii (S.k., CR85, IFO1802), and S. uvarum (S.u.12600, BMV58) strains at 25 and 12°C. Serial dilutions were plated in rich media with (YPD NaCl 0.8 M or KCl 1.25 M) or without (YPD) hyperosmotic stress. A representative image of biological triplicates is presented.
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Figure 1: Osmotolerance of S. paradoxus (S.p., Chr16.2, 108), S. cerevisiae (S.c. FCry, T73), S. kudriavzevii (S.k., CR85, IFO1802), and S. uvarum (S.u.12600, BMV58) strains at 25 and 12°C. Serial dilutions were plated in rich media with (YPD NaCl 0.8 M or KCl 1.25 M) or without (YPD) hyperosmotic stress. A representative image of biological triplicates is presented.

Mentions: The behavior of S. cerevisiae and other Saccharomyces species interesting for industrial applications was evaluated in response to wine fermentation relevant stresses. We selected hyperosmotic (NaCl 0.8 M and KCl 1.25 M) and a combination of hyperosmotic and cold stresses (12°C), two frequent suboptimal conditions during winemaking. We performed a drop test with two strains of each species (S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii, and S. uvarum) on complete media and compared the growth in the above mentioned conditions (Figure 1). The results revealed that the used stresses have a very different effect on yeast growth depending not only on the species but even on the strain. The stress with KCl 1.25 M is the condition that has less effect on the yeast growth capacity, and the NaCl 0.8 M plus 12°C the most severe stress. The conditions NaCl 0.8 M hyperosmotic stress and KCl 1.25 M at 12°C hyperosmotic-cold stress generated intermediate growth capacity levels. The results showed clearly that the strains can cope better with a higher osmotic stress (KCl 1.25 M) than with the sodium toxicity (NaCl 0.8 M). In hyperosmotic stress mediated by NaCl 0.8 M we observed that S. uvarum strains are the ones presenting the highest tolerance to hyperosmotic and a similar observation can be made in the most severe condition (NaCl 0.8 M plus 12°C). The other species showed similar behavior although S. kudriavzevii strains showed low growth levels in cold stress condition, especially IFO1802 strain. S. cerevisiae and S paradoxus strains showed similar growth levels but strain 108 in NaCl 0.8 M at 25°C and strain Chr16.2 in KCl 1.25 M at 12°C presented lower growth levels than S. cerevisiae strains.


Alternative Glycerol Balance Strategies among Saccharomyces Species in Response to Winemaking Stress.

Pérez-Torrado R, Oliveira BM, Zemančíková J, Sychrová H, Querol A - Front Microbiol (2016)

Osmotolerance of S. paradoxus (S.p., Chr16.2, 108), S. cerevisiae (S.c. FCry, T73), S. kudriavzevii (S.k., CR85, IFO1802), and S. uvarum (S.u.12600, BMV58) strains at 25 and 12°C. Serial dilutions were plated in rich media with (YPD NaCl 0.8 M or KCl 1.25 M) or without (YPD) hyperosmotic stress. A representative image of biological triplicates is presented.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814467&req=5

Figure 1: Osmotolerance of S. paradoxus (S.p., Chr16.2, 108), S. cerevisiae (S.c. FCry, T73), S. kudriavzevii (S.k., CR85, IFO1802), and S. uvarum (S.u.12600, BMV58) strains at 25 and 12°C. Serial dilutions were plated in rich media with (YPD NaCl 0.8 M or KCl 1.25 M) or without (YPD) hyperosmotic stress. A representative image of biological triplicates is presented.
Mentions: The behavior of S. cerevisiae and other Saccharomyces species interesting for industrial applications was evaluated in response to wine fermentation relevant stresses. We selected hyperosmotic (NaCl 0.8 M and KCl 1.25 M) and a combination of hyperosmotic and cold stresses (12°C), two frequent suboptimal conditions during winemaking. We performed a drop test with two strains of each species (S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii, and S. uvarum) on complete media and compared the growth in the above mentioned conditions (Figure 1). The results revealed that the used stresses have a very different effect on yeast growth depending not only on the species but even on the strain. The stress with KCl 1.25 M is the condition that has less effect on the yeast growth capacity, and the NaCl 0.8 M plus 12°C the most severe stress. The conditions NaCl 0.8 M hyperosmotic stress and KCl 1.25 M at 12°C hyperosmotic-cold stress generated intermediate growth capacity levels. The results showed clearly that the strains can cope better with a higher osmotic stress (KCl 1.25 M) than with the sodium toxicity (NaCl 0.8 M). In hyperosmotic stress mediated by NaCl 0.8 M we observed that S. uvarum strains are the ones presenting the highest tolerance to hyperosmotic and a similar observation can be made in the most severe condition (NaCl 0.8 M plus 12°C). The other species showed similar behavior although S. kudriavzevii strains showed low growth levels in cold stress condition, especially IFO1802 strain. S. cerevisiae and S paradoxus strains showed similar growth levels but strain 108 in NaCl 0.8 M at 25°C and strain Chr16.2 in KCl 1.25 M at 12°C presented lower growth levels than S. cerevisiae strains.

Bottom Line: The results show different pattern and level of expression among the different species, especially for STL1.These experiments also revealed a different functionality of the glycerol transporters among the different species studied.All these data point to different strategies to handle glycerol accumulation in response to winemaking stresses as hyperosmotic or cold-hyperosmotic stress in the different species, with variable emphasis in the production, influx, or efflux of glycerol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Biotechnology Department, Systems Biology in Yeast of Biotechnological Interest, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos, IATA-CSIC Valencia, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Production and balance of glycerol is essential for the survival of yeast cells in certain stressful conditions as hyperosmotic or cold shock that occur during industrial processes as winemaking. These stress responses are well-known in S. cerevisiae, however, little is known in other phylogenetically close related Saccharomyces species associated with natural or fermentation environments such as S. uvarum, S. paradoxus or S. kudriavzevii. In this work we have investigated the expression of four genes (GPD1, GPD2, STL1, and FPS1) crucial in the glycerol pool balance in the four species with a biotechnological potential (S. cerevisiae; S. paradoxus; S. uvarum; and S. kudriavzevii), and the ability of strains to grow under osmotic and cold stresses. The results show different pattern and level of expression among the different species, especially for STL1. We also studied the function of Stl1 glycerol symporter in the survival to osmotic changes and cell growth capacity in winemaking environments. These experiments also revealed a different functionality of the glycerol transporters among the different species studied. All these data point to different strategies to handle glycerol accumulation in response to winemaking stresses as hyperosmotic or cold-hyperosmotic stress in the different species, with variable emphasis in the production, influx, or efflux of glycerol.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus