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Spatial and Temporal Variation of Cultivable Communities of Co-occurring Endophytes and Pathogens in Wheat.

Comby M, Lacoste S, Baillieul F, Profizi C, Dupont J - Front Microbiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues.Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars.Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Systématique, Evolution et Biodiversité-UMR 7205-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, MNHN, UPMC, EPHE, Muséum National D'histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne UniversitésParis, France; UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles-Laboratoire de Stress Défenses et Reproduction des Plantes, Moulin de la HousseReims, France.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of endogenous microbes from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and to study the structure of its microbial communities, with the ultimate goal to provide candidate strains for future evaluation as potential biological control agents against wheat diseases. We sampled plants from two wheat cultivars, Apache and Caphorn, showing different levels of susceptibility to Fusarium head blight, a major disease of wheat, and tested for variation in microbial diversity and assemblages depending on the host cultivar, host organ (aerial organs vs. roots) or host maturity. Fungi and bacteria were isolated using a culture dependent method. Isolates were identified using ribosomal DNA sequencing and we used diversity analysis to study the community composition of microorganisms over space and time. Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues. Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars. Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of microbial assemblages in wheat plants either in roots or aerial organs, using correspondence analysis. Based on non-singleton taxa. Components 1 and 2 of the correspondence analysis explained respectively, 12.9 and 11.3% of the total inertia.
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Figure 4: Comparison of microbial assemblages in wheat plants either in roots or aerial organs, using correspondence analysis. Based on non-singleton taxa. Components 1 and 2 of the correspondence analysis explained respectively, 12.9 and 11.3% of the total inertia.

Mentions: Globally, when aerial organs were compared to the roots, microbial communities were found to be significantly different using PERMANOVA analysis (p-value = 0.0001, F = 23.6) and correspondence analysis (Figure 4). The indicator species analysis identified three species characteristic of roots that were completely absent from aerial organs (indicator values ranging from 0.17 to 0.48) and 14 indicator species associated with aerial parts of plants (indicator values ranging from 0.21 to 0.83), of which seven were unique to aerial organs (Table 2). Among those, A. infectoria (F37) and M. nivale (F39) colonized extensively the shoots while others were isolated from only one organ, as F. graminearum (F31) from the stems and Paenibacillus hordei (B20) from the leaves.


Spatial and Temporal Variation of Cultivable Communities of Co-occurring Endophytes and Pathogens in Wheat.

Comby M, Lacoste S, Baillieul F, Profizi C, Dupont J - Front Microbiol (2016)

Comparison of microbial assemblages in wheat plants either in roots or aerial organs, using correspondence analysis. Based on non-singleton taxa. Components 1 and 2 of the correspondence analysis explained respectively, 12.9 and 11.3% of the total inertia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814462&req=5

Figure 4: Comparison of microbial assemblages in wheat plants either in roots or aerial organs, using correspondence analysis. Based on non-singleton taxa. Components 1 and 2 of the correspondence analysis explained respectively, 12.9 and 11.3% of the total inertia.
Mentions: Globally, when aerial organs were compared to the roots, microbial communities were found to be significantly different using PERMANOVA analysis (p-value = 0.0001, F = 23.6) and correspondence analysis (Figure 4). The indicator species analysis identified three species characteristic of roots that were completely absent from aerial organs (indicator values ranging from 0.17 to 0.48) and 14 indicator species associated with aerial parts of plants (indicator values ranging from 0.21 to 0.83), of which seven were unique to aerial organs (Table 2). Among those, A. infectoria (F37) and M. nivale (F39) colonized extensively the shoots while others were isolated from only one organ, as F. graminearum (F31) from the stems and Paenibacillus hordei (B20) from the leaves.

Bottom Line: Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues.Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars.Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Systématique, Evolution et Biodiversité-UMR 7205-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, MNHN, UPMC, EPHE, Muséum National D'histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne UniversitésParis, France; UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles-Laboratoire de Stress Défenses et Reproduction des Plantes, Moulin de la HousseReims, France.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of endogenous microbes from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and to study the structure of its microbial communities, with the ultimate goal to provide candidate strains for future evaluation as potential biological control agents against wheat diseases. We sampled plants from two wheat cultivars, Apache and Caphorn, showing different levels of susceptibility to Fusarium head blight, a major disease of wheat, and tested for variation in microbial diversity and assemblages depending on the host cultivar, host organ (aerial organs vs. roots) or host maturity. Fungi and bacteria were isolated using a culture dependent method. Isolates were identified using ribosomal DNA sequencing and we used diversity analysis to study the community composition of microorganisms over space and time. Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues. Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars. Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus