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TiLIA: a software package for image analysis of firefly flash patterns.

Konno J, Hatta-Ohashi Y, Akiyoshi R, Thancharoen A, Silalom S, Sakchoowong W, Yiu V, Ohba N, Suzuki H - Ecol Evol (2016)

Bottom Line: As flash signaling patterns of fireflies are species specific, signal-pattern analysis is important for understanding this system of communication.TiLIA enables flight path tracing of individual fireflies and provides frame-by-frame coordinates and light intensity data.As an example of TiLIA capabilities, we demonstrate flash pattern analysis of the fireflies Luciola cruciata and L. lateralis during courtship behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Advanced Analysis Technology Department Olympus Corporation Kuboyama 2-3 Hachioji Tokyo 192-8512 Japan.

ABSTRACT
As flash signaling patterns of fireflies are species specific, signal-pattern analysis is important for understanding this system of communication. Here, we present time-lapse image analysis (TiLIA), a free open-source software package for signal and flight pattern analyses of fireflies that uses video-recorded image data. TiLIA enables flight path tracing of individual fireflies and provides frame-by-frame coordinates and light intensity data. As an example of TiLIA capabilities, we demonstrate flash pattern analysis of the fireflies Luciola cruciata and L. lateralis during courtship behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Analysis of flash communication of Luciola lateralis by TiLIA. Male and female fireflies are represented by ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle), respectively (left panel), and the time course of light intensities for the two ROIs is displayed as a graph within 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) is described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows), and the flash duration, interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval are 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively. The female flash pattern comprises very rapid double flash, and triple to quadruple flashes. The timer is stamped, sec and msec. The red vertical line indicates the frame number of the image displayed. The integrated video file is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.
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ece32078-fig-0004: Analysis of flash communication of Luciola lateralis by TiLIA. Male and female fireflies are represented by ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle), respectively (left panel), and the time course of light intensities for the two ROIs is displayed as a graph within 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) is described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows), and the flash duration, interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval are 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively. The female flash pattern comprises very rapid double flash, and triple to quadruple flashes. The timer is stamped, sec and msec. The red vertical line indicates the frame number of the image displayed. The integrated video file is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.

Mentions: A pair of L. lateralis was placed in a plastic container, and the flash communication between male and female was recorded by a video camera (Handycam EVCX10, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) equipped with an image intensifier (Star Light Scope, Hamamatsu Photonics, Shizuoka, Japan). The video of the courtship before copulation (phase 4) was converted to an AVI‐formatted file and used for analysis by TiLIA. Figure 4 shows an image with assigned ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle) for male and female fireflies, respectively (left panel), and the graph of the time course of the light intensity of the two ROIs for 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) was described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows in the figure). The flash duration, the interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval were 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively, in average of the five peaks in the graph. The image analysis revealed the twinkling flash recognized by naked eye as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash with an interval of 140 msec. On the other hand, the unique female flash pattern (blue line) was described as a very rapid double flash, triple to quadruple flash. Thus, male‐ and female‐specific flash patterns and the exchange of their flashes during courtship were represented in the graph. The AVI file of male and female activity together with the time‐course analysis is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.


TiLIA: a software package for image analysis of firefly flash patterns.

Konno J, Hatta-Ohashi Y, Akiyoshi R, Thancharoen A, Silalom S, Sakchoowong W, Yiu V, Ohba N, Suzuki H - Ecol Evol (2016)

Analysis of flash communication of Luciola lateralis by TiLIA. Male and female fireflies are represented by ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle), respectively (left panel), and the time course of light intensities for the two ROIs is displayed as a graph within 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) is described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows), and the flash duration, interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval are 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively. The female flash pattern comprises very rapid double flash, and triple to quadruple flashes. The timer is stamped, sec and msec. The red vertical line indicates the frame number of the image displayed. The integrated video file is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814377&req=5

ece32078-fig-0004: Analysis of flash communication of Luciola lateralis by TiLIA. Male and female fireflies are represented by ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle), respectively (left panel), and the time course of light intensities for the two ROIs is displayed as a graph within 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) is described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows), and the flash duration, interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval are 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively. The female flash pattern comprises very rapid double flash, and triple to quadruple flashes. The timer is stamped, sec and msec. The red vertical line indicates the frame number of the image displayed. The integrated video file is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.
Mentions: A pair of L. lateralis was placed in a plastic container, and the flash communication between male and female was recorded by a video camera (Handycam EVCX10, Sony, Tokyo, Japan) equipped with an image intensifier (Star Light Scope, Hamamatsu Photonics, Shizuoka, Japan). The video of the courtship before copulation (phase 4) was converted to an AVI‐formatted file and used for analysis by TiLIA. Figure 4 shows an image with assigned ROIs 1 (red circle) and 2 (blue circle) for male and female fireflies, respectively (left panel), and the graph of the time course of the light intensity of the two ROIs for 3.3 sec (right panel). The male flash pattern (red line) was described as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash (indicated by arrows in the figure). The flash duration, the interflash interval, and the bimodal double‐pulsed interval were 566, 624, and 140 msec, respectively, in average of the five peaks in the graph. The image analysis revealed the twinkling flash recognized by naked eye as a bimodal double‐pulsed flash with an interval of 140 msec. On the other hand, the unique female flash pattern (blue line) was described as a very rapid double flash, triple to quadruple flash. Thus, male‐ and female‐specific flash patterns and the exchange of their flashes during courtship were represented in the graph. The AVI file of male and female activity together with the time‐course analysis is provided in Supporting Information, Appendix S1.

Bottom Line: As flash signaling patterns of fireflies are species specific, signal-pattern analysis is important for understanding this system of communication.TiLIA enables flight path tracing of individual fireflies and provides frame-by-frame coordinates and light intensity data.As an example of TiLIA capabilities, we demonstrate flash pattern analysis of the fireflies Luciola cruciata and L. lateralis during courtship behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Advanced Analysis Technology Department Olympus Corporation Kuboyama 2-3 Hachioji Tokyo 192-8512 Japan.

ABSTRACT
As flash signaling patterns of fireflies are species specific, signal-pattern analysis is important for understanding this system of communication. Here, we present time-lapse image analysis (TiLIA), a free open-source software package for signal and flight pattern analyses of fireflies that uses video-recorded image data. TiLIA enables flight path tracing of individual fireflies and provides frame-by-frame coordinates and light intensity data. As an example of TiLIA capabilities, we demonstrate flash pattern analysis of the fireflies Luciola cruciata and L. lateralis during courtship behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus