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'Compromise' in Echolocation Calls between Different Colonies of the Intermediate Leaf-Nosed Bat (Hipposideros larvatus).

Chen Y, Liu Q, Su Q, Sun Y, Peng X, He X, Zhang L - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Each animal population has its own acoustic signature which facilitates identification, communication and reproduction.The sonar signals of bats can convey social information, such as species identity and contextual information.The goal of this study was to determine whether bats adjust their echolocation call structures to mutually recognize and communicate when they encounter the bats from different colonies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangdong Entomological Institute, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Each animal population has its own acoustic signature which facilitates identification, communication and reproduction. The sonar signals of bats can convey social information, such as species identity and contextual information. The goal of this study was to determine whether bats adjust their echolocation call structures to mutually recognize and communicate when they encounter the bats from different colonies. We used the intermediate leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideros larvatus) as a case study to investigate the variations of echolocation calls when bats from one colony were introduced singly into the home cage of a new colony or two bats from different colonies were cohabitated together for one month. Our experiments showed that the single bat individual altered its peak frequency of echolocation calls to approach the call of new colony members and two bats from different colonies adjusted their call frequencies toward each other to a similar frequency after being chronically cohabitated. These results indicate that the 'compromise' in echolocation calls might be used to ensure effective mutual communication among bats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The variation of peak frequency of A and B colonies in the paired experiment (mean ± SD, n1 = n2 = 6).The asterisks indicate significant differences (medians and 95% credible intervals). A Bonferoni correction was used in the intra-group variation, and an independent-samples t-test was used to test the differences between groups. Paired condition: A1-B1, A2-B2, A3-B3, A4-B4, A5-B5, A6-B6.
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pone.0151382.g003: The variation of peak frequency of A and B colonies in the paired experiment (mean ± SD, n1 = n2 = 6).The asterisks indicate significant differences (medians and 95% credible intervals). A Bonferoni correction was used in the intra-group variation, and an independent-samples t-test was used to test the differences between groups. Paired condition: A1-B1, A2-B2, A3-B3, A4-B4, A5-B5, A6-B6.

Mentions: In experiment 2, the peak frequencies of two colonies both changed significantly after being paired for one month; colony A, which had a higher initial value, decreased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected), whereas colony B, which had a lower initial value, increased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected). However, their call frequencies did not be totally converged, and their peak frequencies remained significantly different after being paired for one month (independent-samples t-test: t = 4.535, p < 0.01). Additionally, their peak frequencies were reversed after separation for one month; colony A showed an increase (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected), whereas colony B decreased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected). Likewise, their separated values showed no significant difference with the initial values (Fig 3, Table C in S1 File).


'Compromise' in Echolocation Calls between Different Colonies of the Intermediate Leaf-Nosed Bat (Hipposideros larvatus).

Chen Y, Liu Q, Su Q, Sun Y, Peng X, He X, Zhang L - PLoS ONE (2016)

The variation of peak frequency of A and B colonies in the paired experiment (mean ± SD, n1 = n2 = 6).The asterisks indicate significant differences (medians and 95% credible intervals). A Bonferoni correction was used in the intra-group variation, and an independent-samples t-test was used to test the differences between groups. Paired condition: A1-B1, A2-B2, A3-B3, A4-B4, A5-B5, A6-B6.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814132&req=5

pone.0151382.g003: The variation of peak frequency of A and B colonies in the paired experiment (mean ± SD, n1 = n2 = 6).The asterisks indicate significant differences (medians and 95% credible intervals). A Bonferoni correction was used in the intra-group variation, and an independent-samples t-test was used to test the differences between groups. Paired condition: A1-B1, A2-B2, A3-B3, A4-B4, A5-B5, A6-B6.
Mentions: In experiment 2, the peak frequencies of two colonies both changed significantly after being paired for one month; colony A, which had a higher initial value, decreased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected), whereas colony B, which had a lower initial value, increased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected). However, their call frequencies did not be totally converged, and their peak frequencies remained significantly different after being paired for one month (independent-samples t-test: t = 4.535, p < 0.01). Additionally, their peak frequencies were reversed after separation for one month; colony A showed an increase (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected), whereas colony B decreased (n = 6, p < 0.001, Bonferoni corrected). Likewise, their separated values showed no significant difference with the initial values (Fig 3, Table C in S1 File).

Bottom Line: Each animal population has its own acoustic signature which facilitates identification, communication and reproduction.The sonar signals of bats can convey social information, such as species identity and contextual information.The goal of this study was to determine whether bats adjust their echolocation call structures to mutually recognize and communicate when they encounter the bats from different colonies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangdong Entomological Institute, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Each animal population has its own acoustic signature which facilitates identification, communication and reproduction. The sonar signals of bats can convey social information, such as species identity and contextual information. The goal of this study was to determine whether bats adjust their echolocation call structures to mutually recognize and communicate when they encounter the bats from different colonies. We used the intermediate leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideros larvatus) as a case study to investigate the variations of echolocation calls when bats from one colony were introduced singly into the home cage of a new colony or two bats from different colonies were cohabitated together for one month. Our experiments showed that the single bat individual altered its peak frequency of echolocation calls to approach the call of new colony members and two bats from different colonies adjusted their call frequencies toward each other to a similar frequency after being chronically cohabitated. These results indicate that the 'compromise' in echolocation calls might be used to ensure effective mutual communication among bats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus