Limits...
Feeling of Pleasure to High-Intensity Interval Exercise Is Dependent of the Number of Work Bouts and Physical Activity Status.

Frazão DT, de Farias Junior LF, Dantas TC, Krinski K, Elsangedy HM, Prestes J, Hardcastle SJ, Costa EC - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Also, the insufficiently active group displayed lower values of mean, lowest, and highest affective response, as well as lower values of affective response at the highest RPE than the active group (p < 0.001).There were no differences in the RPE and HR between the groups (p > 0.05).Investigations on the effects of low-volume HIIE protocols including a fewer number of work bouts on health status and fitness of less active subjects would be interesting, especially in the first training weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To examine the affective responses during a single bout of a low-volume HIIE in active and insufficiently active men.

Materials and methods: Fifty-eight men (aged 25.3 ± 3.6 years) volunteered to participate in this study: i) active (n = 29) and ii) insufficiently active (n = 29). Each subject undertook i) initial screening and physical evaluation, ii) maximal exercise test, and iii) a single bout of a low-volume HIIE. The HIIE protocol consisted of 10 x 60s work bouts at 90% of maximal treadmill velocity (MTV) interspersed with 60s of active recovery at 30% of MTV. Affective responses (Feeling Scale, -5/+5), rating of perceived exertion (Borg's RPE, 6-20), and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the last 10s of each work bout. A two-factor mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA, independent-samples t test, and chi-squared test were used to data analysis.

Results: There were similar positive affective responses to the first three work bouts between insufficiently active and active men (p > 0.05). However, insufficiently active group displayed lower affective responses over time (work bout 4 to 10) than the active group (p < 0.01). Also, the insufficiently active group displayed lower values of mean, lowest, and highest affective response, as well as lower values of affective response at the highest RPE than the active group (p < 0.001). There were no differences in the RPE and HR between the groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Insufficiently active and active men report feelings of pleasure to few work bouts (i.e., 3-4) during low-volume HIIE, while the affective responses become more unpleasant over time for insufficiently active subjects. Investigations on the effects of low-volume HIIE protocols including a fewer number of work bouts on health status and fitness of less active subjects would be interesting, especially in the first training weeks.

Show MeSH
Correlation analysis between affective response and rating of perceived exertion during a single bout of high-intensity interval exercise.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814045&req=5

pone.0152752.g004: Correlation analysis between affective response and rating of perceived exertion during a single bout of high-intensity interval exercise.

Mentions: Fig 4 shows the correlation analysis of RPE and affective response during the HIIE bout in the active and insufficiently active groups. There was a negative correlation between RPE and affective response for both groups (p < 0.001; r = -.74 for the active groups and r = -.51 for the insufficiently active group).


Feeling of Pleasure to High-Intensity Interval Exercise Is Dependent of the Number of Work Bouts and Physical Activity Status.

Frazão DT, de Farias Junior LF, Dantas TC, Krinski K, Elsangedy HM, Prestes J, Hardcastle SJ, Costa EC - PLoS ONE (2016)

Correlation analysis between affective response and rating of perceived exertion during a single bout of high-intensity interval exercise.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814045&req=5

pone.0152752.g004: Correlation analysis between affective response and rating of perceived exertion during a single bout of high-intensity interval exercise.
Mentions: Fig 4 shows the correlation analysis of RPE and affective response during the HIIE bout in the active and insufficiently active groups. There was a negative correlation between RPE and affective response for both groups (p < 0.001; r = -.74 for the active groups and r = -.51 for the insufficiently active group).

Bottom Line: Also, the insufficiently active group displayed lower values of mean, lowest, and highest affective response, as well as lower values of affective response at the highest RPE than the active group (p < 0.001).There were no differences in the RPE and HR between the groups (p > 0.05).Investigations on the effects of low-volume HIIE protocols including a fewer number of work bouts on health status and fitness of less active subjects would be interesting, especially in the first training weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To examine the affective responses during a single bout of a low-volume HIIE in active and insufficiently active men.

Materials and methods: Fifty-eight men (aged 25.3 ± 3.6 years) volunteered to participate in this study: i) active (n = 29) and ii) insufficiently active (n = 29). Each subject undertook i) initial screening and physical evaluation, ii) maximal exercise test, and iii) a single bout of a low-volume HIIE. The HIIE protocol consisted of 10 x 60s work bouts at 90% of maximal treadmill velocity (MTV) interspersed with 60s of active recovery at 30% of MTV. Affective responses (Feeling Scale, -5/+5), rating of perceived exertion (Borg's RPE, 6-20), and heart rate (HR) were recorded during the last 10s of each work bout. A two-factor mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA, independent-samples t test, and chi-squared test were used to data analysis.

Results: There were similar positive affective responses to the first three work bouts between insufficiently active and active men (p > 0.05). However, insufficiently active group displayed lower affective responses over time (work bout 4 to 10) than the active group (p < 0.01). Also, the insufficiently active group displayed lower values of mean, lowest, and highest affective response, as well as lower values of affective response at the highest RPE than the active group (p < 0.001). There were no differences in the RPE and HR between the groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Insufficiently active and active men report feelings of pleasure to few work bouts (i.e., 3-4) during low-volume HIIE, while the affective responses become more unpleasant over time for insufficiently active subjects. Investigations on the effects of low-volume HIIE protocols including a fewer number of work bouts on health status and fitness of less active subjects would be interesting, especially in the first training weeks.

Show MeSH