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Resting State EEG Hemispheric Power Asymmetry in Children with Dyslexia.

Papagiannopoulou EA, Lagopoulos J - Front Pediatr (2016)

Bottom Line: It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system.We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables.This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney , Camperdown, NSW , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder estimated to affect between 4 and 7% of the population. It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system. To better understand the neural underpinnings of dyslexia, we examined the electroencephalography (EEG) power spectra between pre-adolescents with dyslexia and neurotypical control children during eyes closed state. We reported the differences in spontaneous oscillatory activity of each major EEG band (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) adopting a global as well as in a region-by-region and hemispheric approach to elucidate whether there are changes in asymmetry in children with dyslexia compared to controls. We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables. The findings of our study confirm the presence of an atypical linguistic network, evident in children with dyslexia. This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical topographical maps depicting group average differences and KS-statistics for Theta EEG power. (A) Group average Theta power differences between children with dyslexia and controls localized to Broca’s area. (B) Kolmogorov–Smirnov between group statistic indicating significant topographical between group differences in Broca’s area, frontal regions, and the left hemisphere.
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Figure 2: Statistical topographical maps depicting group average differences and KS-statistics for Theta EEG power. (A) Group average Theta power differences between children with dyslexia and controls localized to Broca’s area. (B) Kolmogorov–Smirnov between group statistic indicating significant topographical between group differences in Broca’s area, frontal regions, and the left hemisphere.

Mentions: Children with dyslexia had significantly greater Theta power in the frontal region [F(5.25); df(1,38); p = 0.028] (mean = 1.79; SD = 2.0; range = 7.7), also significantly greater Theta power in Broca’s Area [F(6.34); df(1,38); p = 0.016] (mean = 4.38; SD = 2.3; range = 9.6) and greater Theta power in the left hemisphere [F(4.74); df(1,38); p = 0.36] (mean = 1.9; SD = 3.4; range = 8.3), when compared to controls (see Figures 1 and 2).


Resting State EEG Hemispheric Power Asymmetry in Children with Dyslexia.

Papagiannopoulou EA, Lagopoulos J - Front Pediatr (2016)

Statistical topographical maps depicting group average differences and KS-statistics for Theta EEG power. (A) Group average Theta power differences between children with dyslexia and controls localized to Broca’s area. (B) Kolmogorov–Smirnov between group statistic indicating significant topographical between group differences in Broca’s area, frontal regions, and the left hemisphere.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764697&req=5

Figure 2: Statistical topographical maps depicting group average differences and KS-statistics for Theta EEG power. (A) Group average Theta power differences between children with dyslexia and controls localized to Broca’s area. (B) Kolmogorov–Smirnov between group statistic indicating significant topographical between group differences in Broca’s area, frontal regions, and the left hemisphere.
Mentions: Children with dyslexia had significantly greater Theta power in the frontal region [F(5.25); df(1,38); p = 0.028] (mean = 1.79; SD = 2.0; range = 7.7), also significantly greater Theta power in Broca’s Area [F(6.34); df(1,38); p = 0.016] (mean = 4.38; SD = 2.3; range = 9.6) and greater Theta power in the left hemisphere [F(4.74); df(1,38); p = 0.36] (mean = 1.9; SD = 3.4; range = 8.3), when compared to controls (see Figures 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system.We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables.This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney , Camperdown, NSW , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder estimated to affect between 4 and 7% of the population. It is often referred to as a learning disability and is characterized by deficits in the linguistic system. To better understand the neural underpinnings of dyslexia, we examined the electroencephalography (EEG) power spectra between pre-adolescents with dyslexia and neurotypical control children during eyes closed state. We reported the differences in spontaneous oscillatory activity of each major EEG band (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) adopting a global as well as in a region-by-region and hemispheric approach to elucidate whether there are changes in asymmetry in children with dyslexia compared to controls. We also examined the relationship between EEG power spectra and clinical variables. The findings of our study confirm the presence of an atypical linguistic network, evident in children with dyslexia. This abnormal network hallmarked by a dominance of theta activity suggests that these abnormalities are present prior to these children learning to read, thus implicating delayed maturation and abnormal hypoarousal mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus