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Jumping the Gun: Mapping Neural Correlates of Waiting Impulsivity and Relevance Across Alcohol Misuse.

Morris LS, Kundu P, Baek K, Irvine MA, Mechelmans DJ, Wood J, Harrison NA, Robbins TW, Bullmore ET, Voon V - Biol. Psychiatry (2015)

Bottom Line: Waiting impulsivity was associated with lower connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus with ventral striatum and subgenual cingulate, regions similarly implicated in rodent lesion studies.Using machine learning techniques we showed that subthalamic connectivity differentiates binge drinkers and individuals with alcohol use disorders from healthy volunteers.We highlight the translational and clinical relevance of dissociable functional systems of cortical, striatal, and hyperdirect connections with the subthalamic nucleus in modulating waiting and stopping and their importance across dimensions of alcohol misuse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subthalamic nucleus connectivity in binge drinkers and alcohol use disorders. (A) Independent samples t test to compare region of interest to whole-brain voxel connectivity maps for subthalamic nucleus (STN) between groups revealed reduced connectivity of the STN with both the subgenual cingulate cortex and the inferior parietal cortex (cluster-extent threshold analysis p < .05) compared with age- matched healthy volunteers. (B) A trend toward a positive correlation (p = .058) was observed between weeks abstinent and connectivity between STN and right ventral striatum (VS) in individuals with alcohol use disorder.
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f0025: Subthalamic nucleus connectivity in binge drinkers and alcohol use disorders. (A) Independent samples t test to compare region of interest to whole-brain voxel connectivity maps for subthalamic nucleus (STN) between groups revealed reduced connectivity of the STN with both the subgenual cingulate cortex and the inferior parietal cortex (cluster-extent threshold analysis p < .05) compared with age- matched healthy volunteers. (B) A trend toward a positive correlation (p = .058) was observed between weeks abstinent and connectivity between STN and right ventral striatum (VS) in individuals with alcohol use disorder.

Mentions: STN ROI-to-whole-brain voxel connectivity maps were entered into independent sample t tests to compare groups. Group comparisons were performed using cluster extent threshold correction, calculated at 15 voxels at p < .001 whole brain uncorrected, correcting for multiple comparisons at p < .05 assuming an individual voxel type I error of p = .01 (38). Cluster-extent threshold analysis revealed that both AUD and BD had reduced STN connectivity with subgenual cingulate cortex (peak reported in Montreal Neurological Institute coordinates xyz = −45 −41 42 mm; cluster size = 45; Z = 4.32; p = .036; Figure 5A) and inferior parietal cortex (xyz = 1 19 −10 mm; cluster size = 58; Z = 4.83; p = .019) compared with HVs.


Jumping the Gun: Mapping Neural Correlates of Waiting Impulsivity and Relevance Across Alcohol Misuse.

Morris LS, Kundu P, Baek K, Irvine MA, Mechelmans DJ, Wood J, Harrison NA, Robbins TW, Bullmore ET, Voon V - Biol. Psychiatry (2015)

Subthalamic nucleus connectivity in binge drinkers and alcohol use disorders. (A) Independent samples t test to compare region of interest to whole-brain voxel connectivity maps for subthalamic nucleus (STN) between groups revealed reduced connectivity of the STN with both the subgenual cingulate cortex and the inferior parietal cortex (cluster-extent threshold analysis p < .05) compared with age- matched healthy volunteers. (B) A trend toward a positive correlation (p = .058) was observed between weeks abstinent and connectivity between STN and right ventral striatum (VS) in individuals with alcohol use disorder.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764648&req=5

f0025: Subthalamic nucleus connectivity in binge drinkers and alcohol use disorders. (A) Independent samples t test to compare region of interest to whole-brain voxel connectivity maps for subthalamic nucleus (STN) between groups revealed reduced connectivity of the STN with both the subgenual cingulate cortex and the inferior parietal cortex (cluster-extent threshold analysis p < .05) compared with age- matched healthy volunteers. (B) A trend toward a positive correlation (p = .058) was observed between weeks abstinent and connectivity between STN and right ventral striatum (VS) in individuals with alcohol use disorder.
Mentions: STN ROI-to-whole-brain voxel connectivity maps were entered into independent sample t tests to compare groups. Group comparisons were performed using cluster extent threshold correction, calculated at 15 voxels at p < .001 whole brain uncorrected, correcting for multiple comparisons at p < .05 assuming an individual voxel type I error of p = .01 (38). Cluster-extent threshold analysis revealed that both AUD and BD had reduced STN connectivity with subgenual cingulate cortex (peak reported in Montreal Neurological Institute coordinates xyz = −45 −41 42 mm; cluster size = 45; Z = 4.32; p = .036; Figure 5A) and inferior parietal cortex (xyz = 1 19 −10 mm; cluster size = 58; Z = 4.83; p = .019) compared with HVs.

Bottom Line: Waiting impulsivity was associated with lower connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus with ventral striatum and subgenual cingulate, regions similarly implicated in rodent lesion studies.Using machine learning techniques we showed that subthalamic connectivity differentiates binge drinkers and individuals with alcohol use disorders from healthy volunteers.We highlight the translational and clinical relevance of dissociable functional systems of cortical, striatal, and hyperdirect connections with the subthalamic nucleus in modulating waiting and stopping and their importance across dimensions of alcohol misuse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus