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Modelling the Impact of Atherosclerosis on Drug Release and Distribution from Coronary Stents.

McKittrick CM, Kennedy S, Oldroyd KG, McGinty S, McCormick C - Ann Biomed Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: However, there is limited information regarding the precise role that the atherosclerotic lesion has in determining the uptake and distribution of drug.In this review, we start by discussing the various models that have been used in this research area, highlighting the different types of information they can provide.We then go on to describe more recent methods that incorporate the impact of atherosclerotic lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

ABSTRACT
Although drug-eluting stents (DES) are now widely used for the treatment of coronary heart disease, there remains considerable scope for the development of enhanced designs which address some of the limitations of existing devices. The drug release profile is a key element governing the overall performance of DES. The use of in vitro, in vivo, ex vivo, in silico and mathematical models has enhanced understanding of the factors which govern drug uptake and distribution from DES. Such work has identified the physical phenomena determining the transport of drug from the stent and through tissue, and has highlighted the importance of stent coatings and drug physical properties to this process. However, there is limited information regarding the precise role that the atherosclerotic lesion has in determining the uptake and distribution of drug. In this review, we start by discussing the various models that have been used in this research area, highlighting the different types of information they can provide. We then go on to describe more recent methods that incorporate the impact of atherosclerotic lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A simplified diagram illustrating the key arterial ultrastructures and the transport forces involved in drug distribution within a stented artery. Drug is transported through the vessel wall by various forces and partitions to both specific and non-specific binding sites. Figure adapted from Yang et al. 2006.73
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Fig1: A simplified diagram illustrating the key arterial ultrastructures and the transport forces involved in drug distribution within a stented artery. Drug is transported through the vessel wall by various forces and partitions to both specific and non-specific binding sites. Figure adapted from Yang et al. 2006.73

Mentions: Stent-based drug release and the subsequent uptake and distribution within arterial tissue is a complex phenomenon, involving a series of different but often interdependent mechanisms (Fig. 1). Several models are available, which attempt to describe at least some aspects of this phenomenon. Schwartz et al. 200856 made a series of recommendations on a variety of pre-clinical tests that should be performed during DES development and evaluation. These range from simple in vitro dissolution tests through to whole animal studies. In the first part of this review, we will describe the current state of the art within each test type. We will also consider the emerging role that ex vivo models and computational techniques are playing in this area.Figure 1


Modelling the Impact of Atherosclerosis on Drug Release and Distribution from Coronary Stents.

McKittrick CM, Kennedy S, Oldroyd KG, McGinty S, McCormick C - Ann Biomed Eng (2015)

A simplified diagram illustrating the key arterial ultrastructures and the transport forces involved in drug distribution within a stented artery. Drug is transported through the vessel wall by various forces and partitions to both specific and non-specific binding sites. Figure adapted from Yang et al. 2006.73
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764635&req=5

Fig1: A simplified diagram illustrating the key arterial ultrastructures and the transport forces involved in drug distribution within a stented artery. Drug is transported through the vessel wall by various forces and partitions to both specific and non-specific binding sites. Figure adapted from Yang et al. 2006.73
Mentions: Stent-based drug release and the subsequent uptake and distribution within arterial tissue is a complex phenomenon, involving a series of different but often interdependent mechanisms (Fig. 1). Several models are available, which attempt to describe at least some aspects of this phenomenon. Schwartz et al. 200856 made a series of recommendations on a variety of pre-clinical tests that should be performed during DES development and evaluation. These range from simple in vitro dissolution tests through to whole animal studies. In the first part of this review, we will describe the current state of the art within each test type. We will also consider the emerging role that ex vivo models and computational techniques are playing in this area.Figure 1

Bottom Line: However, there is limited information regarding the precise role that the atherosclerotic lesion has in determining the uptake and distribution of drug.In this review, we start by discussing the various models that have been used in this research area, highlighting the different types of information they can provide.We then go on to describe more recent methods that incorporate the impact of atherosclerotic lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

ABSTRACT
Although drug-eluting stents (DES) are now widely used for the treatment of coronary heart disease, there remains considerable scope for the development of enhanced designs which address some of the limitations of existing devices. The drug release profile is a key element governing the overall performance of DES. The use of in vitro, in vivo, ex vivo, in silico and mathematical models has enhanced understanding of the factors which govern drug uptake and distribution from DES. Such work has identified the physical phenomena determining the transport of drug from the stent and through tissue, and has highlighted the importance of stent coatings and drug physical properties to this process. However, there is limited information regarding the precise role that the atherosclerotic lesion has in determining the uptake and distribution of drug. In this review, we start by discussing the various models that have been used in this research area, highlighting the different types of information they can provide. We then go on to describe more recent methods that incorporate the impact of atherosclerotic lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus