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Mercury and antimony in wastewater: fate and treatment.

Hargreaves AJ, Vale P, Whelan J, Constantino C, Dotro G, Cartmell E - Water Air Soil Pollut (2016)

Bottom Line: Elevated final effluent Sb concentrations compared with crude values were postulated and were suggested to result from Sb present in returned sludge liquors.For Hg, chemical techniques (specifically precipitation) were found to be the most suitable whilst for Sb, adsorption (using granulated ferric hydroxide) was deemed most appropriate.Operational solutions, such as lengthening hydraulic retention time, and treatment technologies deployed on sludge liquors were also reviewed but were not feasible for implementation at the works.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cranfield Water Science Institute, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedford, MK43 0AL UK.

ABSTRACT

It is important to understand the fate of Hg and Sb within the wastewater treatment process so as to examine potential treatment options and to ensure compliance with regulatory standards. The fate of Hg and Sb was investigated for an activated sludge process treatment works in the UK. Relatively high crude values (Hg 0.092 μg/L, Sb 1.73 μg/L) were observed at the works, whilst low removal rates within the primary (Hg 52.2 %, Sb 16.3 %) and secondary treatment stages (Hg 29.5 %, Sb -28.9 %) resulted in final effluent concentrations of 0.031 μg/L for Hg and 2.04 μg/L for Sb. Removal of Hg was positively correlated with suspended solids (SS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, whilst Sb was negatively correlated. Elevated final effluent Sb concentrations compared with crude values were postulated and were suggested to result from Sb present in returned sludge liquors. Kepner Tregoe (KT) analysis was applied to identify suitable treatment technologies. For Hg, chemical techniques (specifically precipitation) were found to be the most suitable whilst for Sb, adsorption (using granulated ferric hydroxide) was deemed most appropriate. Operational solutions, such as lengthening hydraulic retention time, and treatment technologies deployed on sludge liquors were also reviewed but were not feasible for implementation at the works.

No MeSH data available.


Sb concentrations observed in effluent (a) and sludge samples (b) at the works (mean ± SD)
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Fig4: Sb concentrations observed in effluent (a) and sludge samples (b) at the works (mean ± SD)

Mentions: Mean concentrations of Sb within sludge belts 1–7 (7.81 μg/L) and sludge belts 8–9 (6.03 μg/L) were high compared with SAS belt filtrate (2.97 μg/L), dewatering belts filtrate (5.08 μg/L) and cake pad run-off (5.11 μg/L). However, the large variability of Sb concentrations observed for each sludge sample location at the works (Fig. 4b) meant that the differences between sample points were not statistically significant (p = 0.214).Fig. 4


Mercury and antimony in wastewater: fate and treatment.

Hargreaves AJ, Vale P, Whelan J, Constantino C, Dotro G, Cartmell E - Water Air Soil Pollut (2016)

Sb concentrations observed in effluent (a) and sludge samples (b) at the works (mean ± SD)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764622&req=5

Fig4: Sb concentrations observed in effluent (a) and sludge samples (b) at the works (mean ± SD)
Mentions: Mean concentrations of Sb within sludge belts 1–7 (7.81 μg/L) and sludge belts 8–9 (6.03 μg/L) were high compared with SAS belt filtrate (2.97 μg/L), dewatering belts filtrate (5.08 μg/L) and cake pad run-off (5.11 μg/L). However, the large variability of Sb concentrations observed for each sludge sample location at the works (Fig. 4b) meant that the differences between sample points were not statistically significant (p = 0.214).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Elevated final effluent Sb concentrations compared with crude values were postulated and were suggested to result from Sb present in returned sludge liquors.For Hg, chemical techniques (specifically precipitation) were found to be the most suitable whilst for Sb, adsorption (using granulated ferric hydroxide) was deemed most appropriate.Operational solutions, such as lengthening hydraulic retention time, and treatment technologies deployed on sludge liquors were also reviewed but were not feasible for implementation at the works.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cranfield Water Science Institute, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedford, MK43 0AL UK.

ABSTRACT

It is important to understand the fate of Hg and Sb within the wastewater treatment process so as to examine potential treatment options and to ensure compliance with regulatory standards. The fate of Hg and Sb was investigated for an activated sludge process treatment works in the UK. Relatively high crude values (Hg 0.092 μg/L, Sb 1.73 μg/L) were observed at the works, whilst low removal rates within the primary (Hg 52.2 %, Sb 16.3 %) and secondary treatment stages (Hg 29.5 %, Sb -28.9 %) resulted in final effluent concentrations of 0.031 μg/L for Hg and 2.04 μg/L for Sb. Removal of Hg was positively correlated with suspended solids (SS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, whilst Sb was negatively correlated. Elevated final effluent Sb concentrations compared with crude values were postulated and were suggested to result from Sb present in returned sludge liquors. Kepner Tregoe (KT) analysis was applied to identify suitable treatment technologies. For Hg, chemical techniques (specifically precipitation) were found to be the most suitable whilst for Sb, adsorption (using granulated ferric hydroxide) was deemed most appropriate. Operational solutions, such as lengthening hydraulic retention time, and treatment technologies deployed on sludge liquors were also reviewed but were not feasible for implementation at the works.

No MeSH data available.