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Untwisting the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

Christensen RP, Bokinsky A, Santella A, Wu Y, Marquina-Solis J, Guo M, Kovacevic I, Kumar A, Winter PW, Tashakkori N, McCreedy E, Liu H, McAuliffe M, Mohler W, Colón-Ramos DA, Bao Z, Shroff H - Elife (2015)

Bottom Line: However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis.The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo.The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.

ABSTRACT
The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple embryonic nervous system with few enough neurons that the growth of each cell could be followed to provide a systems-level view of development. However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis. We present open-source untwisting and annotation software (http://mipav.cit.nih.gov/plugin_jws/mipav_worm_plugin.php) that allows the investigation of neurodevelopmental events in late embryogenesis and apply it to track the 3D positions of seam cell nuclei, neurons, and neurites in multiple elongating embryos. We also provide a tutorial describing how to use the software (Supplementary file 1) and a detailed description of the untwisting algorithm (Appendix). The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo. The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The expanded worm model.The original ellipses are expanded until they contact an adjacent surface of the worm or they reach the boundary of the sample plane.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.051
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fig19: The expanded worm model.The original ellipses are expanded until they contact an adjacent surface of the worm or they reach the boundary of the sample plane.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.051

Mentions: Once 2D sampling planes have been determined, each sampling plane is constrained by an elliptical model of the worm cross-section with limits defined by the left- and right-side curves. The elliptical model is tested for regions of the worm where the ellipses overlap and all voxels that fall into overlapping areas are removed, producing a set of new contours. The new contours are then expanded outward from the center, until they either contact an expanding contour line from another region of the worm or reach the limit of the sample plane. This process defines the 2D sampling planes and contours within the planes that are used to create the worm model. Appendix 1—figure 12 shows the original elliptical model of the worm, Appendix 1—figure 13 shows the corrected and expanded contours, and Appendix 1—figures 14–16 show a solid version of the worm model.10.7554/eLife.10070.051Appendix 1—figure 13.The expanded worm model.


Untwisting the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

Christensen RP, Bokinsky A, Santella A, Wu Y, Marquina-Solis J, Guo M, Kovacevic I, Kumar A, Winter PW, Tashakkori N, McCreedy E, Liu H, McAuliffe M, Mohler W, Colón-Ramos DA, Bao Z, Shroff H - Elife (2015)

The expanded worm model.The original ellipses are expanded until they contact an adjacent surface of the worm or they reach the boundary of the sample plane.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.051
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764590&req=5

fig19: The expanded worm model.The original ellipses are expanded until they contact an adjacent surface of the worm or they reach the boundary of the sample plane.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.051
Mentions: Once 2D sampling planes have been determined, each sampling plane is constrained by an elliptical model of the worm cross-section with limits defined by the left- and right-side curves. The elliptical model is tested for regions of the worm where the ellipses overlap and all voxels that fall into overlapping areas are removed, producing a set of new contours. The new contours are then expanded outward from the center, until they either contact an expanding contour line from another region of the worm or reach the limit of the sample plane. This process defines the 2D sampling planes and contours within the planes that are used to create the worm model. Appendix 1—figure 12 shows the original elliptical model of the worm, Appendix 1—figure 13 shows the corrected and expanded contours, and Appendix 1—figures 14–16 show a solid version of the worm model.10.7554/eLife.10070.051Appendix 1—figure 13.The expanded worm model.

Bottom Line: However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis.The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo.The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.

ABSTRACT
The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple embryonic nervous system with few enough neurons that the growth of each cell could be followed to provide a systems-level view of development. However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis. We present open-source untwisting and annotation software (http://mipav.cit.nih.gov/plugin_jws/mipav_worm_plugin.php) that allows the investigation of neurodevelopmental events in late embryogenesis and apply it to track the 3D positions of seam cell nuclei, neurons, and neurites in multiple elongating embryos. We also provide a tutorial describing how to use the software (Supplementary file 1) and a detailed description of the untwisting algorithm (Appendix). The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo. The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus