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Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine.

Nemani VM, Derman PB, Kim HJ - Asian Spine J (2016)

Bottom Line: In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance.In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment.We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.

ABSTRACT
Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mid-sagittal fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging sequence showing severe spinal cord compression and myelomalacia (white arrow) from cervical kyphosis with a central disc herniation and posterior longitudinal ligament hypertrophy.
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Figure 5: Mid-sagittal fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging sequence showing severe spinal cord compression and myelomalacia (white arrow) from cervical kyphosis with a central disc herniation and posterior longitudinal ligament hypertrophy.

Mentions: In addition to plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indicated for patients with cervical deformity and long-standing arm or neck pain, neurologic abnormalities, or worsening symptoms. This imaging modality is useful in evaluating soft tissue pathology, such as intervertebral disc herniation and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy and buckling. Furthermore, it can be used to quantify the extent of cord compression, flattening, myelomalacia, and syrinx formation, as well as concomitant nerve root impingement, if present (Fig. 5). Cord atrophy may be observed in long-standing cases [614]. These cord changes increase the risk of postoperative neurologic deficit after surgery [6].


Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine.

Nemani VM, Derman PB, Kim HJ - Asian Spine J (2016)

Mid-sagittal fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging sequence showing severe spinal cord compression and myelomalacia (white arrow) from cervical kyphosis with a central disc herniation and posterior longitudinal ligament hypertrophy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4764533&req=5

Figure 5: Mid-sagittal fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging sequence showing severe spinal cord compression and myelomalacia (white arrow) from cervical kyphosis with a central disc herniation and posterior longitudinal ligament hypertrophy.
Mentions: In addition to plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indicated for patients with cervical deformity and long-standing arm or neck pain, neurologic abnormalities, or worsening symptoms. This imaging modality is useful in evaluating soft tissue pathology, such as intervertebral disc herniation and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy and buckling. Furthermore, it can be used to quantify the extent of cord compression, flattening, myelomalacia, and syrinx formation, as well as concomitant nerve root impingement, if present (Fig. 5). Cord atrophy may be observed in long-standing cases [614]. These cord changes increase the risk of postoperative neurologic deficit after surgery [6].

Bottom Line: In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance.In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment.We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.

ABSTRACT
Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus