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National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China.

Jiang G, Chen H, Wang Q, Chi B, He Q, Xiao H, Zhou Q, Liu J, Wang S - Med Educ Online (2016)

Bottom Line: The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study.The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%).It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Educational Department, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study.

Methods: Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated.

Results: The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China) participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%).

Conclusions: The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

No MeSH data available.


The variation of the questions in each final competition.
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Figure 0003: The variation of the questions in each final competition.

Mentions: The competition mainly covered internal medicine, surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, pediatrics, ophthalmology, ENT, and dermatology. The scope of the competition covered approximately 100 clinical skills (Table 1). According to the different requirements of the assessment, the questions in the finals can be divided into three categories: type I, using task trainers to evaluate the individual technical skills, which focused on the proficiency and quality of the performance; type II, using SP or task trainer associated with short clinical cases to assess technical skills, clinical reasoning, and professionalism; type III, integrates SP, high fidelity simulator or other clinical simulations, and long clinical cases, to evaluate the comprehensive ability and professionalism of students. The proportions of the three types of questions in the finals continuously evolved. The first and second competitions mainly used type I/II questions, while the remaining competitions mainly used type II/III questions (Fig. 3).


National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China.

Jiang G, Chen H, Wang Q, Chi B, He Q, Xiao H, Zhou Q, Liu J, Wang S - Med Educ Online (2016)

The variation of the questions in each final competition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759833&req=5

Figure 0003: The variation of the questions in each final competition.
Mentions: The competition mainly covered internal medicine, surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, pediatrics, ophthalmology, ENT, and dermatology. The scope of the competition covered approximately 100 clinical skills (Table 1). According to the different requirements of the assessment, the questions in the finals can be divided into three categories: type I, using task trainers to evaluate the individual technical skills, which focused on the proficiency and quality of the performance; type II, using SP or task trainer associated with short clinical cases to assess technical skills, clinical reasoning, and professionalism; type III, integrates SP, high fidelity simulator or other clinical simulations, and long clinical cases, to evaluate the comprehensive ability and professionalism of students. The proportions of the three types of questions in the finals continuously evolved. The first and second competitions mainly used type I/II questions, while the remaining competitions mainly used type II/III questions (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study.The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%).It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Educational Department, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study.

Methods: Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated.

Results: The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China) participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%).

Conclusions: The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

No MeSH data available.