Limits...
An MRI-based classification scheme to predict passive access of 5 to 50-nm large nanoparticles to tumors.

Karageorgis A, Dufort S, Sancey L, Henry M, Hirsjärvi S, Passirani C, Benoit JP, Gravier J, Texier I, Montigon O, Benmerad M, Siroux V, Barbier EL, Coll JL - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Nanoparticles are useful tools in oncology because of their capacity to passively accumulate in tumors in particular via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect.However, the importance and reliability of this effect remains controversial and quite often unpredictable.Translated to a clinical situation, this strategy could help anticipate the EPR effect of a particular tumor and thus its accessibility to nanomedicines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM U823, Institut Albert Bonniot, Grenoble, France.

ABSTRACT
Nanoparticles are useful tools in oncology because of their capacity to passively accumulate in tumors in particular via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, the importance and reliability of this effect remains controversial and quite often unpredictable. In this preclinical study, we used optical imaging to detect the accumulation of three types of fluorescent nanoparticles in eight different subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models, and dynamic contrast-enhanced and vessel size index Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to measure the functional parameters of these tumors. The results demonstrate that the permeability and blood volume fraction determined by MRI are useful parameters for predicting the capacity of a tumor to accumulate nanoparticles. Translated to a clinical situation, this strategy could help anticipate the EPR effect of a particular tumor and thus its accessibility to nanomedicines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Passive accumulation of lipidic nanoemulsions (LNEs) in six different subcutaneous tumors after intravenous injection.The LNEs were intravenously injected (10 nmol of dye) into subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice (n = 3/group). 2D-fluorescence imaging was performed before and 1.5 hours, 3 hours, 5 hours and 24 hours after the injection of LNEs. Tumor and skin fluorescence signals were semi-quantified on whole-body images. The results are presented as the mean ± SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759815&req=5

f6: Passive accumulation of lipidic nanoemulsions (LNEs) in six different subcutaneous tumors after intravenous injection.The LNEs were intravenously injected (10 nmol of dye) into subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice (n = 3/group). 2D-fluorescence imaging was performed before and 1.5 hours, 3 hours, 5 hours and 24 hours after the injection of LNEs. Tumor and skin fluorescence signals were semi-quantified on whole-body images. The results are presented as the mean ± SD.

Mentions: LNEs were injected into a set of mice bearing the six types of subcutaneous tumors previously studied (n = 3/group). The fluorescent signal was semi-quantified from whole-body images, and the tumor/skin ratios were calculated at different time points after intravenous injection of LNEs. In agreement with the data obtained with LNCs, the results showed that HUH-7 and HEK293(ß3) tumors exhibited tumor/skin ratios ranging from 1 to 1.5, corresponding to “EPR-negative” tumors. By contrast, the four other tumor types (i.e., IGROV1, U87MG, HT29 and TS/a-pc) exhibited tumor/skin ratios greater than 1.5 as early as 3 hours after injection, reaching 2.5 at 24 hours (Fig. 6). These tumors can be considered “EPR-positive”.


An MRI-based classification scheme to predict passive access of 5 to 50-nm large nanoparticles to tumors.

Karageorgis A, Dufort S, Sancey L, Henry M, Hirsjärvi S, Passirani C, Benoit JP, Gravier J, Texier I, Montigon O, Benmerad M, Siroux V, Barbier EL, Coll JL - Sci Rep (2016)

Passive accumulation of lipidic nanoemulsions (LNEs) in six different subcutaneous tumors after intravenous injection.The LNEs were intravenously injected (10 nmol of dye) into subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice (n = 3/group). 2D-fluorescence imaging was performed before and 1.5 hours, 3 hours, 5 hours and 24 hours after the injection of LNEs. Tumor and skin fluorescence signals were semi-quantified on whole-body images. The results are presented as the mean ± SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759815&req=5

f6: Passive accumulation of lipidic nanoemulsions (LNEs) in six different subcutaneous tumors after intravenous injection.The LNEs were intravenously injected (10 nmol of dye) into subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice (n = 3/group). 2D-fluorescence imaging was performed before and 1.5 hours, 3 hours, 5 hours and 24 hours after the injection of LNEs. Tumor and skin fluorescence signals were semi-quantified on whole-body images. The results are presented as the mean ± SD.
Mentions: LNEs were injected into a set of mice bearing the six types of subcutaneous tumors previously studied (n = 3/group). The fluorescent signal was semi-quantified from whole-body images, and the tumor/skin ratios were calculated at different time points after intravenous injection of LNEs. In agreement with the data obtained with LNCs, the results showed that HUH-7 and HEK293(ß3) tumors exhibited tumor/skin ratios ranging from 1 to 1.5, corresponding to “EPR-negative” tumors. By contrast, the four other tumor types (i.e., IGROV1, U87MG, HT29 and TS/a-pc) exhibited tumor/skin ratios greater than 1.5 as early as 3 hours after injection, reaching 2.5 at 24 hours (Fig. 6). These tumors can be considered “EPR-positive”.

Bottom Line: Nanoparticles are useful tools in oncology because of their capacity to passively accumulate in tumors in particular via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect.However, the importance and reliability of this effect remains controversial and quite often unpredictable.Translated to a clinical situation, this strategy could help anticipate the EPR effect of a particular tumor and thus its accessibility to nanomedicines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM U823, Institut Albert Bonniot, Grenoble, France.

ABSTRACT
Nanoparticles are useful tools in oncology because of their capacity to passively accumulate in tumors in particular via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, the importance and reliability of this effect remains controversial and quite often unpredictable. In this preclinical study, we used optical imaging to detect the accumulation of three types of fluorescent nanoparticles in eight different subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models, and dynamic contrast-enhanced and vessel size index Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to measure the functional parameters of these tumors. The results demonstrate that the permeability and blood volume fraction determined by MRI are useful parameters for predicting the capacity of a tumor to accumulate nanoparticles. Translated to a clinical situation, this strategy could help anticipate the EPR effect of a particular tumor and thus its accessibility to nanomedicines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus