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Plant essential oils and potassium metabisulfite as repellents for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

Renkema JM, Wright D, Buitenhuis R, Hallett RH - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Thyme oil was unique because it caused high male mortality and reduced the number of responding flies compared to other oils.KMS was not found to be repellent to D. suzukii, but may have fumigant properties, particularly at high concentrations.This is the first time that essential oils have been evaluated and proven effective in preventing fruit-infesting flies from contacting attractive stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Rd. E., Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1 G 2W1.

ABSTRACT
Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is a globally invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit. Females oviposit into ripening fruit and larvae cause direct destruction of tissues. As many plant essential oils are permitted food additives, they may provide a safe means of protecting fruit from D. suzukii infestation in both conventional and organic production systems. Twelve oils and potassium metabisulfite (KMS) were screened in the laboratory as repellents for D. suzukii flies. Most essential oils deterred D. suzukii flies from cotton wicks containing attractive raspberry juice. Peppermint oil was particularly effective, preventing almost all flies from contacting treated wicks and remaining 100% repellent for 6 d post-application. Thyme oil was unique because it caused high male mortality and reduced the number of responding flies compared to other oils. KMS was not found to be repellent to D. suzukii, but may have fumigant properties, particularly at high concentrations. Peppermint oil appears to be the best candidate for field testing to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of using essential oils as part of a push-pull management strategy against D. suzukii. This is the first time that essential oils have been evaluated and proven effective in preventing fruit-infesting flies from contacting attractive stimuli.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent female Drosophila suzukii choosing cotton wicks with raspberry juice (filled bars) or raspberry juice + essential oil (empty bars) at 1, 6 and 24 h after start of experiment (Exp. 1).Numbers of flies responding given in parentheses. Significant differences (G test): ***(P < 0.001), **(P < 0.01), *(P < 0.05), ‘NS’ no significant difference (P > 0.05).
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f2: Percent female Drosophila suzukii choosing cotton wicks with raspberry juice (filled bars) or raspberry juice + essential oil (empty bars) at 1, 6 and 24 h after start of experiment (Exp. 1).Numbers of flies responding given in parentheses. Significant differences (G test): ***(P < 0.001), **(P < 0.01), *(P < 0.05), ‘NS’ no significant difference (P > 0.05).

Mentions: All essential oils, except balsam fir, showed a significant level of repellency to female D. suzukii (Fig. 2). Few female flies chose geranium, peppermint, citronella, lavender, or thyme oil-treated wicks throughout the duration of the experiment, whereas eastern white cedar, white pine, white spruce, and rosemary oils did not repel flies after 6 or 24 h. Ginger and eucalyptus oils were significantly repellent after 24 h, but 10–20% of females settled on wicks treated with these oils.


Plant essential oils and potassium metabisulfite as repellents for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

Renkema JM, Wright D, Buitenhuis R, Hallett RH - Sci Rep (2016)

Percent female Drosophila suzukii choosing cotton wicks with raspberry juice (filled bars) or raspberry juice + essential oil (empty bars) at 1, 6 and 24 h after start of experiment (Exp. 1).Numbers of flies responding given in parentheses. Significant differences (G test): ***(P < 0.001), **(P < 0.01), *(P < 0.05), ‘NS’ no significant difference (P > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759814&req=5

f2: Percent female Drosophila suzukii choosing cotton wicks with raspberry juice (filled bars) or raspberry juice + essential oil (empty bars) at 1, 6 and 24 h after start of experiment (Exp. 1).Numbers of flies responding given in parentheses. Significant differences (G test): ***(P < 0.001), **(P < 0.01), *(P < 0.05), ‘NS’ no significant difference (P > 0.05).
Mentions: All essential oils, except balsam fir, showed a significant level of repellency to female D. suzukii (Fig. 2). Few female flies chose geranium, peppermint, citronella, lavender, or thyme oil-treated wicks throughout the duration of the experiment, whereas eastern white cedar, white pine, white spruce, and rosemary oils did not repel flies after 6 or 24 h. Ginger and eucalyptus oils were significantly repellent after 24 h, but 10–20% of females settled on wicks treated with these oils.

Bottom Line: Thyme oil was unique because it caused high male mortality and reduced the number of responding flies compared to other oils.KMS was not found to be repellent to D. suzukii, but may have fumigant properties, particularly at high concentrations.This is the first time that essential oils have been evaluated and proven effective in preventing fruit-infesting flies from contacting attractive stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Rd. E., Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1 G 2W1.

ABSTRACT
Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is a globally invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit. Females oviposit into ripening fruit and larvae cause direct destruction of tissues. As many plant essential oils are permitted food additives, they may provide a safe means of protecting fruit from D. suzukii infestation in both conventional and organic production systems. Twelve oils and potassium metabisulfite (KMS) were screened in the laboratory as repellents for D. suzukii flies. Most essential oils deterred D. suzukii flies from cotton wicks containing attractive raspberry juice. Peppermint oil was particularly effective, preventing almost all flies from contacting treated wicks and remaining 100% repellent for 6 d post-application. Thyme oil was unique because it caused high male mortality and reduced the number of responding flies compared to other oils. KMS was not found to be repellent to D. suzukii, but may have fumigant properties, particularly at high concentrations. Peppermint oil appears to be the best candidate for field testing to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of using essential oils as part of a push-pull management strategy against D. suzukii. This is the first time that essential oils have been evaluated and proven effective in preventing fruit-infesting flies from contacting attractive stimuli.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus