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Evolving random fractal Cantor superlattices for the infrared using a genetic algorithm.

Bossard JA, Lin L, Werner DH - J R Soc Interface (2016)

Bottom Line: Fractal geometry, often described as the geometry of Nature, can be used to mimic structures found in Nature, but deterministic fractals produce structures that are too 'perfect' to appear natural.Furthermore, we introduce fractal random Cantor bars as a candidate for generating both ordered and 'chaotic' superlattices, such as the ones found in silvery fish.We present optimized superlattices demonstrating broadband reflection as well as single and multiple pass bands in the near-infrared regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 211A Electrical Engineering East, University Park, PA 16802, USA jab678@psu.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over the near-IR and mid-IR bands of interest. (Online version in colour.)
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RSIF20150975F6: Measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over the near-IR and mid-IR bands of interest. (Online version in colour.)

Mentions: For the following examples, practical design parameters were imposed on the superlattice optimization. In the case of the theoretical example, the permittivities for the materials exhibited a large contrast. Thus, a-Si and SiO2 were chosen as the materials for practical superlattice designs because they have a large contrast in permittivity. Measured dispersive permittivities of a-Si and SiO2 were used in the analytical model for the superlattice and are approximately 11.6 and 2.0 in the bands of interest in the near-IR and mid-IR. FigureĀ 6 shows the measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over a wider band in the near-IR and mid-IR. These practical superlattice designs are also placed on a thick glass substrate. The intended fabrication procedure is to form the superlattice layers by iteratively depositing a-Si and SiO2. The minimum layer thickness is set to be around 20 nm.Figure 6.


Evolving random fractal Cantor superlattices for the infrared using a genetic algorithm.

Bossard JA, Lin L, Werner DH - J R Soc Interface (2016)

Measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over the near-IR and mid-IR bands of interest. (Online version in colour.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759801&req=5

RSIF20150975F6: Measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over the near-IR and mid-IR bands of interest. (Online version in colour.)
Mentions: For the following examples, practical design parameters were imposed on the superlattice optimization. In the case of the theoretical example, the permittivities for the materials exhibited a large contrast. Thus, a-Si and SiO2 were chosen as the materials for practical superlattice designs because they have a large contrast in permittivity. Measured dispersive permittivities of a-Si and SiO2 were used in the analytical model for the superlattice and are approximately 11.6 and 2.0 in the bands of interest in the near-IR and mid-IR. FigureĀ 6 shows the measured dispersive permittivity for a-Si and SiO2 over a wider band in the near-IR and mid-IR. These practical superlattice designs are also placed on a thick glass substrate. The intended fabrication procedure is to form the superlattice layers by iteratively depositing a-Si and SiO2. The minimum layer thickness is set to be around 20 nm.Figure 6.

Bottom Line: Fractal geometry, often described as the geometry of Nature, can be used to mimic structures found in Nature, but deterministic fractals produce structures that are too 'perfect' to appear natural.Furthermore, we introduce fractal random Cantor bars as a candidate for generating both ordered and 'chaotic' superlattices, such as the ones found in silvery fish.We present optimized superlattices demonstrating broadband reflection as well as single and multiple pass bands in the near-infrared regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 211A Electrical Engineering East, University Park, PA 16802, USA jab678@psu.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus