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Multiphysics and multiscale modelling, data-model fusion and integration of organ physiology in the clinic: ventricular cardiac mechanics.

Chabiniok R, Wang VY, Hadjicharalambous M, Asner L, Lee J, Sermesant M, Kuhl E, Young AA, Moireau P, Nash MP, Chapelle D, Nordsletten DA - Interface Focus (2016)

Bottom Line: Computational modelling has been proposed and actively pursued as a tool for accelerating research and translation.Allowing exploration of the relationships between physics, multiscale mechanisms and function, computational modelling provides a platform for improving our understanding of the heart.Further integration of experimental and clinical data through data assimilation and parameter estimation techniques is bringing computational models closer to use in routine clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK; Inria and Paris-Saclay University, Bâtiment Alan Turing, 1 rue Honoré d'Estienne d'Orves, Campus de l'Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91120, France.

ABSTRACT
With heart and cardiovascular diseases continually challenging healthcare systems worldwide, translating basic research on cardiac (patho)physiology into clinical care is essential. Exacerbating this already extensive challenge is the complexity of the heart, relying on its hierarchical structure and function to maintain cardiovascular flow. Computational modelling has been proposed and actively pursued as a tool for accelerating research and translation. Allowing exploration of the relationships between physics, multiscale mechanisms and function, computational modelling provides a platform for improving our understanding of the heart. Further integration of experimental and clinical data through data assimilation and parameter estimation techniques is bringing computational models closer to use in routine clinical practice. This article reviews developments in computational cardiac modelling and how their integration with medical imaging data is providing new pathways for translational cardiac modelling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustrative representation of multiscale cardiac anatomy. (a) Geometric representation of the biventricular anatomy of the heart with streamlines illustrating its fibre architecture, (b) tissue block illustrating the laminar structure of the heart comprising fibre bundles arranged into sheets separated by cleavage planes, (c) local structural arrangement of myocytes and coronary capillaries, (d) 3D view of the cardiomyocyte cut to view internal structures (data courtesy of Dr Rajagopal and Dr Soeller [1,2]), (e) anatomy of the cell illustrating nucleus, myofibres (comprising crossbridges) and mitochondria. RV, right ventricle; LV, left ventricle; PV, pulmonary valve; AV, aortic valve; MV, mitral valve; ECM, extracellular matrix; Mito., mitochondria.
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RSFS20150083F1: Illustrative representation of multiscale cardiac anatomy. (a) Geometric representation of the biventricular anatomy of the heart with streamlines illustrating its fibre architecture, (b) tissue block illustrating the laminar structure of the heart comprising fibre bundles arranged into sheets separated by cleavage planes, (c) local structural arrangement of myocytes and coronary capillaries, (d) 3D view of the cardiomyocyte cut to view internal structures (data courtesy of Dr Rajagopal and Dr Soeller [1,2]), (e) anatomy of the cell illustrating nucleus, myofibres (comprising crossbridges) and mitochondria. RV, right ventricle; LV, left ventricle; PV, pulmonary valve; AV, aortic valve; MV, mitral valve; ECM, extracellular matrix; Mito., mitochondria.

Mentions: Heart function is the orchestration of multiple physical processes occurring across spatial scales that must act in concert to carry out its principal role: the transport of blood through the cardiovascular system. Interest in cardiac physiology stretches beyond scientific curiosity to genuine need, with diseases of the heart posing significant challenges to the vitality of societies, healthcare systems and economies worldwide. Discord in cardiac function leading to pathology can occur at every spatial scale (figure 1). Changes in protein isoforms in the contractile unit of the heart (sarcomere), in gene expression and organization of proteins, in the constitution of the extracellular tissue scaffold, in the flow of blood through the muscle, in the excitation of the muscle or in the anatomy of the organ highlight a few of many examples. The cumulative effect of pathology in heart disease—often an ensemble of multiple modifications—ultimately re-tunes cardiac function, leading to a progressive deterioration in performance as the heart struggles to maintain output. Cardiology has advanced significantly, improving care and outcomes in patients. However, our ability to diagnose specific mechanisms, plan or adapt therapy, and/or predict treatment outcomes in patients continues to present challenges, reflecting a need to improve how we use knowledge of cardiology to analyse—or model—the heart.Figure 1.


Multiphysics and multiscale modelling, data-model fusion and integration of organ physiology in the clinic: ventricular cardiac mechanics.

Chabiniok R, Wang VY, Hadjicharalambous M, Asner L, Lee J, Sermesant M, Kuhl E, Young AA, Moireau P, Nash MP, Chapelle D, Nordsletten DA - Interface Focus (2016)

Illustrative representation of multiscale cardiac anatomy. (a) Geometric representation of the biventricular anatomy of the heart with streamlines illustrating its fibre architecture, (b) tissue block illustrating the laminar structure of the heart comprising fibre bundles arranged into sheets separated by cleavage planes, (c) local structural arrangement of myocytes and coronary capillaries, (d) 3D view of the cardiomyocyte cut to view internal structures (data courtesy of Dr Rajagopal and Dr Soeller [1,2]), (e) anatomy of the cell illustrating nucleus, myofibres (comprising crossbridges) and mitochondria. RV, right ventricle; LV, left ventricle; PV, pulmonary valve; AV, aortic valve; MV, mitral valve; ECM, extracellular matrix; Mito., mitochondria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759748&req=5

RSFS20150083F1: Illustrative representation of multiscale cardiac anatomy. (a) Geometric representation of the biventricular anatomy of the heart with streamlines illustrating its fibre architecture, (b) tissue block illustrating the laminar structure of the heart comprising fibre bundles arranged into sheets separated by cleavage planes, (c) local structural arrangement of myocytes and coronary capillaries, (d) 3D view of the cardiomyocyte cut to view internal structures (data courtesy of Dr Rajagopal and Dr Soeller [1,2]), (e) anatomy of the cell illustrating nucleus, myofibres (comprising crossbridges) and mitochondria. RV, right ventricle; LV, left ventricle; PV, pulmonary valve; AV, aortic valve; MV, mitral valve; ECM, extracellular matrix; Mito., mitochondria.
Mentions: Heart function is the orchestration of multiple physical processes occurring across spatial scales that must act in concert to carry out its principal role: the transport of blood through the cardiovascular system. Interest in cardiac physiology stretches beyond scientific curiosity to genuine need, with diseases of the heart posing significant challenges to the vitality of societies, healthcare systems and economies worldwide. Discord in cardiac function leading to pathology can occur at every spatial scale (figure 1). Changes in protein isoforms in the contractile unit of the heart (sarcomere), in gene expression and organization of proteins, in the constitution of the extracellular tissue scaffold, in the flow of blood through the muscle, in the excitation of the muscle or in the anatomy of the organ highlight a few of many examples. The cumulative effect of pathology in heart disease—often an ensemble of multiple modifications—ultimately re-tunes cardiac function, leading to a progressive deterioration in performance as the heart struggles to maintain output. Cardiology has advanced significantly, improving care and outcomes in patients. However, our ability to diagnose specific mechanisms, plan or adapt therapy, and/or predict treatment outcomes in patients continues to present challenges, reflecting a need to improve how we use knowledge of cardiology to analyse—or model—the heart.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Computational modelling has been proposed and actively pursued as a tool for accelerating research and translation.Allowing exploration of the relationships between physics, multiscale mechanisms and function, computational modelling provides a platform for improving our understanding of the heart.Further integration of experimental and clinical data through data assimilation and parameter estimation techniques is bringing computational models closer to use in routine clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK; Inria and Paris-Saclay University, Bâtiment Alan Turing, 1 rue Honoré d'Estienne d'Orves, Campus de l'Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91120, France.

ABSTRACT
With heart and cardiovascular diseases continually challenging healthcare systems worldwide, translating basic research on cardiac (patho)physiology into clinical care is essential. Exacerbating this already extensive challenge is the complexity of the heart, relying on its hierarchical structure and function to maintain cardiovascular flow. Computational modelling has been proposed and actively pursued as a tool for accelerating research and translation. Allowing exploration of the relationships between physics, multiscale mechanisms and function, computational modelling provides a platform for improving our understanding of the heart. Further integration of experimental and clinical data through data assimilation and parameter estimation techniques is bringing computational models closer to use in routine clinical practice. This article reviews developments in computational cardiac modelling and how their integration with medical imaging data is providing new pathways for translational cardiac modelling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus