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Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica) and afoxolaner (NexGard) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs.

Six RH, Liebenberg J, Honsberger NA, Mahabir SP - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Bottom Line: Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle.This was noticeably more evident towards the end of the treatment period.The rapid and consistent kill of fleas within 8 to 12 h after a single oral dose of sarolaner over 35 days indicates that this treatment will provide highly effective control of flea infestations, relief for dogs afflicted with flea allergy dermatitis, and should reduce the risk of flea-borne pathogen transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, 333 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI, 49007, USA. robert.six@Zoetis.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fleas are the most common ectoparasite infesting dogs globally. The many possible sequellae of infestation include: direct discomfort; allergic reactions; and the transmission of pathogens. Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle. In this study, the speed of kill of a novel orally administered isoxazoline parasiticide, sarolaner (Simparica) against fleas on dogs was evaluated and compared with afoxolaner (NexGard) for 5 weeks after a single oral dose.

Methods: Twenty-four dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with a single oral dose at label rate of either sarolaner (2 to 4 mg/kg) or afoxolaner (2.5 to 6.8 mg/kg) or placebo, based on pretreatment flea counts. Dogs were combed and live fleas counted at 8, 12 and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs.

Results: There were no adverse reactions to treatment. A single oral dose of sarolaner provided ≥98.8% efficacy (based on geometric means) within 8 h of treatment or subsequent weekly re-infestations of fleas to Day 35. By 12 h, fleas were virtually eradicated from all dogs, with only two fleas recovered from a single sarolaner-treated dog on Day 7; efficacy was 100% at all other time points. Significantly greater numbers of live fleas were recovered from afoxolaner-treated dogs at 8 h on all days and at 12 h on Days 28 and 35 (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: In this controlled laboratory evaluation, sarolaner had a significantly faster speed of kill against fleas than afoxolaner. This was noticeably more evident towards the end of the treatment period. The rapid and consistent kill of fleas within 8 to 12 h after a single oral dose of sarolaner over 35 days indicates that this treatment will provide highly effective control of flea infestations, relief for dogs afflicted with flea allergy dermatitis, and should reduce the risk of flea-borne pathogen transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent efficacy based on geometric mean counts relative to placebo at 8 and 12 h after treatment and weekly post treatment re-infestations of fleas for dogs treated with a single oral dose of sarolaner or afoxolaner on Day 0
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Fig1: Percent efficacy based on geometric mean counts relative to placebo at 8 and 12 h after treatment and weekly post treatment re-infestations of fleas for dogs treated with a single oral dose of sarolaner or afoxolaner on Day 0

Mentions: At the 8-h time point, both treatments resulted in significantly lower flea counts than placebo-treated dogs (P ≤ 0.0005) throughout the study (Table 1). Treatment with sarolaner also resulted in significantly lower flea counts than afoxolaner at 8 h on all assessment days (P ≤ 0.0499) and the sarolaner treatment provided greater and more consistent efficacy at 8 h (≥98.8 %, ≥97.9 % geometric, arithmetic mean) for the entire study. Efficacy based on geometric means for afoxolaner ranged from 76.3 to 99.4 %, and on arithmetic means from 65.2 to 99.1 % (Table 1). Notably, the efficacy for the afoxolaner-treated dogs declined as the study progressed, and was <90 % from Day 21 onwards (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica) and afoxolaner (NexGard) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs.

Six RH, Liebenberg J, Honsberger NA, Mahabir SP - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Percent efficacy based on geometric mean counts relative to placebo at 8 and 12 h after treatment and weekly post treatment re-infestations of fleas for dogs treated with a single oral dose of sarolaner or afoxolaner on Day 0
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759729&req=5

Fig1: Percent efficacy based on geometric mean counts relative to placebo at 8 and 12 h after treatment and weekly post treatment re-infestations of fleas for dogs treated with a single oral dose of sarolaner or afoxolaner on Day 0
Mentions: At the 8-h time point, both treatments resulted in significantly lower flea counts than placebo-treated dogs (P ≤ 0.0005) throughout the study (Table 1). Treatment with sarolaner also resulted in significantly lower flea counts than afoxolaner at 8 h on all assessment days (P ≤ 0.0499) and the sarolaner treatment provided greater and more consistent efficacy at 8 h (≥98.8 %, ≥97.9 % geometric, arithmetic mean) for the entire study. Efficacy based on geometric means for afoxolaner ranged from 76.3 to 99.4 %, and on arithmetic means from 65.2 to 99.1 % (Table 1). Notably, the efficacy for the afoxolaner-treated dogs declined as the study progressed, and was <90 % from Day 21 onwards (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle.This was noticeably more evident towards the end of the treatment period.The rapid and consistent kill of fleas within 8 to 12 h after a single oral dose of sarolaner over 35 days indicates that this treatment will provide highly effective control of flea infestations, relief for dogs afflicted with flea allergy dermatitis, and should reduce the risk of flea-borne pathogen transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, 333 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI, 49007, USA. robert.six@Zoetis.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Fleas are the most common ectoparasite infesting dogs globally. The many possible sequellae of infestation include: direct discomfort; allergic reactions; and the transmission of pathogens. Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle. In this study, the speed of kill of a novel orally administered isoxazoline parasiticide, sarolaner (Simparica) against fleas on dogs was evaluated and compared with afoxolaner (NexGard) for 5 weeks after a single oral dose.

Methods: Twenty-four dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with a single oral dose at label rate of either sarolaner (2 to 4 mg/kg) or afoxolaner (2.5 to 6.8 mg/kg) or placebo, based on pretreatment flea counts. Dogs were combed and live fleas counted at 8, 12 and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs.

Results: There were no adverse reactions to treatment. A single oral dose of sarolaner provided ≥98.8% efficacy (based on geometric means) within 8 h of treatment or subsequent weekly re-infestations of fleas to Day 35. By 12 h, fleas were virtually eradicated from all dogs, with only two fleas recovered from a single sarolaner-treated dog on Day 7; efficacy was 100% at all other time points. Significantly greater numbers of live fleas were recovered from afoxolaner-treated dogs at 8 h on all days and at 12 h on Days 28 and 35 (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: In this controlled laboratory evaluation, sarolaner had a significantly faster speed of kill against fleas than afoxolaner. This was noticeably more evident towards the end of the treatment period. The rapid and consistent kill of fleas within 8 to 12 h after a single oral dose of sarolaner over 35 days indicates that this treatment will provide highly effective control of flea infestations, relief for dogs afflicted with flea allergy dermatitis, and should reduce the risk of flea-borne pathogen transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus