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In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution.

Chen FR, Van Dyck D, Kisielowski C - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons.The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces.We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, 101 Kuang-Fu Road, Hsin Chu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we report a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Focus maps and mass maps.(a) Focus map for Ge. (b) Focus map for Au bridge. (c) Focus map for MgO, which shows focus patches that correspond to the peaks indicated in the histogram (fig. 3c). (d) Mass map for Ge. (e) Mass map for Au bridge. (f) Mass map for MgO. The humps indicated in the mass histogram of MgO (fig. 3c) corresponds to the mass patches.
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f8: Focus maps and mass maps.(a) Focus map for Ge. (b) Focus map for Au bridge. (c) Focus map for MgO, which shows focus patches that correspond to the peaks indicated in the histogram (fig. 3c). (d) Mass map for Ge. (e) Mass map for Au bridge. (f) Mass map for MgO. The humps indicated in the mass histogram of MgO (fig. 3c) corresponds to the mass patches.

Mentions: Figure 8 shows the focus maps that are obtained by correcting the focus in every atomic column and the corresponding focus histograms are shown in Fig. 3a–c. For Ge [110], we observe a focus gradient across the image from bottom left (∼−30 Å) to the top right (∼10 Å). In the focus map of Au, the focus value along the line A–B line shows a difference of ∼26–30 Å between the edge and centre parts. The focus map of the MgO exhibits a number of flat focus patches numbered from 1 to 11. This histogram is discrete at the Angstrom level, which suggests that the addition of single atoms to a column can be measured by a related change of focus.


In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution.

Chen FR, Van Dyck D, Kisielowski C - Nat Commun (2016)

Focus maps and mass maps.(a) Focus map for Ge. (b) Focus map for Au bridge. (c) Focus map for MgO, which shows focus patches that correspond to the peaks indicated in the histogram (fig. 3c). (d) Mass map for Ge. (e) Mass map for Au bridge. (f) Mass map for MgO. The humps indicated in the mass histogram of MgO (fig. 3c) corresponds to the mass patches.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4759637&req=5

f8: Focus maps and mass maps.(a) Focus map for Ge. (b) Focus map for Au bridge. (c) Focus map for MgO, which shows focus patches that correspond to the peaks indicated in the histogram (fig. 3c). (d) Mass map for Ge. (e) Mass map for Au bridge. (f) Mass map for MgO. The humps indicated in the mass histogram of MgO (fig. 3c) corresponds to the mass patches.
Mentions: Figure 8 shows the focus maps that are obtained by correcting the focus in every atomic column and the corresponding focus histograms are shown in Fig. 3a–c. For Ge [110], we observe a focus gradient across the image from bottom left (∼−30 Å) to the top right (∼10 Å). In the focus map of Au, the focus value along the line A–B line shows a difference of ∼26–30 Å between the edge and centre parts. The focus map of the MgO exhibits a number of flat focus patches numbered from 1 to 11. This histogram is discrete at the Angstrom level, which suggests that the addition of single atoms to a column can be measured by a related change of focus.

Bottom Line: Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons.The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces.We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, 101 Kuang-Fu Road, Hsin Chu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we report a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus