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Infiltrating angiolipoma of the chest wall: a rare clinical entity.

Mayooran N, Tarazi M, O'Brien O, Hinchion J - J Surg Case Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: There are only a handful of cases reported in the literature.Malignancy is suspected in the differential diagnosis, and hence a tissue diagnosis is needed to rule out an underlying malignancy.We report a case of an infiltrating angiolipoma of the chest wall, which was successfully treated with surgical excision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland mayoor18@yahoo.co.uk nmayooran@rcsi.ie.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A vascular lesion composed of large thin- and thick-walled blood vessels embedded within adipose tissue. 4× objective under haematoxylin and eosin staining.
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RJV165F3: A vascular lesion composed of large thin- and thick-walled blood vessels embedded within adipose tissue. 4× objective under haematoxylin and eosin staining.

Mentions: Patient initially underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy of this mass in order to rule out an underlying malignancy. Biopsy results showed non-specific adipose cells. After discussion of her case and histology in our institution's multidisciplinary meeting and given that the patient was still complaining of pain around that region, a decision to proceed with surgical excision was made. We performed a wide local excision of the chest wall lesion (Fig. 2), and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Post-operatively, her long-standing neuropathic pain reduced significantly. Histological study of the lesion showed abundant lobulated adipose tissue noted to extend between skeletal muscle fibres. This also incorporated a vascular lesion displaying organizing thrombus formation within occasional vascular lumens (Fig. 3). These findings are consistent with typical features of an angiolipoma.Figure 2:


Infiltrating angiolipoma of the chest wall: a rare clinical entity.

Mayooran N, Tarazi M, O'Brien O, Hinchion J - J Surg Case Rep (2016)

A vascular lesion composed of large thin- and thick-walled blood vessels embedded within adipose tissue. 4× objective under haematoxylin and eosin staining.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697921&req=5

RJV165F3: A vascular lesion composed of large thin- and thick-walled blood vessels embedded within adipose tissue. 4× objective under haematoxylin and eosin staining.
Mentions: Patient initially underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy of this mass in order to rule out an underlying malignancy. Biopsy results showed non-specific adipose cells. After discussion of her case and histology in our institution's multidisciplinary meeting and given that the patient was still complaining of pain around that region, a decision to proceed with surgical excision was made. We performed a wide local excision of the chest wall lesion (Fig. 2), and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Post-operatively, her long-standing neuropathic pain reduced significantly. Histological study of the lesion showed abundant lobulated adipose tissue noted to extend between skeletal muscle fibres. This also incorporated a vascular lesion displaying organizing thrombus formation within occasional vascular lumens (Fig. 3). These findings are consistent with typical features of an angiolipoma.Figure 2:

Bottom Line: There are only a handful of cases reported in the literature.Malignancy is suspected in the differential diagnosis, and hence a tissue diagnosis is needed to rule out an underlying malignancy.We report a case of an infiltrating angiolipoma of the chest wall, which was successfully treated with surgical excision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland mayoor18@yahoo.co.uk nmayooran@rcsi.ie.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus