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Authenticity and Relationship Satisfaction: Two Distinct Ways of Directing Power to Self-Esteem.

Wang YN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: As power is associated with both self-oriented goals and social-responsibility goals, we proposed that power predicts self-esteem through two positive personal and interpersonal results: authenticity and relationship satisfaction.More importantly, multiple mediation analysis showed that authenticity and relationship satisfaction both mediated the effects of power on self-esteem, even when controlling for participants' communal orientation and social desirability.Our findings demonstrate that authenticity and relationship satisfaction represent two key mechanisms by which power is associated with self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China.

ABSTRACT
Possessing power contributes to high self-esteem, but how power enhances self-esteem is still unknown. As power is associated with both self-oriented goals and social-responsibility goals, we proposed that power predicts self-esteem through two positive personal and interpersonal results: authenticity and relationship satisfaction. Three studies were carried out with a total of 505 Chinese participants, including college students and adults, who completed surveys that assessed personal power, self-esteem, authenticity, relationship satisfaction, communal orientation, and social desirability. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses demonstrated that power, authenticity, and relationship satisfaction each uniquely contributed to self-esteem. More importantly, multiple mediation analysis showed that authenticity and relationship satisfaction both mediated the effects of power on self-esteem, even when controlling for participants' communal orientation and social desirability. Our findings demonstrate that authenticity and relationship satisfaction represent two key mechanisms by which power is associated with self-esteem.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A mutiple mediation model of the association between power and self-esteem via authenticity and relationship satisfaction when controlling of social desirability (n = 210).Note: Path estimates are unstandardized. **p < .01, ***p < .001.
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pone.0146050.g003: A mutiple mediation model of the association between power and self-esteem via authenticity and relationship satisfaction when controlling of social desirability (n = 210).Note: Path estimates are unstandardized. **p < .01, ***p < .001.

Mentions: Then, we used an SPSS macro designed for assessing multiple mediation models [34] to examine whether authenticity and relationship satisfaction mediate the effects of power on self-esteem when controlling for participants’ social desirability. The results showed that authenticity was a significant mediator, such that power was positively related to authenticity (B = .75), which, in turn, was positively related to self-esteem (B = .33) (see Fig 3). Additionally, relationship satisfaction was positively related to both power (B = .56) and self-esteem (B = .55). These results indicated that the association between power and self-esteem could be explained by both authenticity and relationship satisfaction, even when controlling for social desirability (see Table 6).


Authenticity and Relationship Satisfaction: Two Distinct Ways of Directing Power to Self-Esteem.

Wang YN - PLoS ONE (2015)

A mutiple mediation model of the association between power and self-esteem via authenticity and relationship satisfaction when controlling of social desirability (n = 210).Note: Path estimates are unstandardized. **p < .01, ***p < .001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697820&req=5

pone.0146050.g003: A mutiple mediation model of the association between power and self-esteem via authenticity and relationship satisfaction when controlling of social desirability (n = 210).Note: Path estimates are unstandardized. **p < .01, ***p < .001.
Mentions: Then, we used an SPSS macro designed for assessing multiple mediation models [34] to examine whether authenticity and relationship satisfaction mediate the effects of power on self-esteem when controlling for participants’ social desirability. The results showed that authenticity was a significant mediator, such that power was positively related to authenticity (B = .75), which, in turn, was positively related to self-esteem (B = .33) (see Fig 3). Additionally, relationship satisfaction was positively related to both power (B = .56) and self-esteem (B = .55). These results indicated that the association between power and self-esteem could be explained by both authenticity and relationship satisfaction, even when controlling for social desirability (see Table 6).

Bottom Line: As power is associated with both self-oriented goals and social-responsibility goals, we proposed that power predicts self-esteem through two positive personal and interpersonal results: authenticity and relationship satisfaction.More importantly, multiple mediation analysis showed that authenticity and relationship satisfaction both mediated the effects of power on self-esteem, even when controlling for participants' communal orientation and social desirability.Our findings demonstrate that authenticity and relationship satisfaction represent two key mechanisms by which power is associated with self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China.

ABSTRACT
Possessing power contributes to high self-esteem, but how power enhances self-esteem is still unknown. As power is associated with both self-oriented goals and social-responsibility goals, we proposed that power predicts self-esteem through two positive personal and interpersonal results: authenticity and relationship satisfaction. Three studies were carried out with a total of 505 Chinese participants, including college students and adults, who completed surveys that assessed personal power, self-esteem, authenticity, relationship satisfaction, communal orientation, and social desirability. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses demonstrated that power, authenticity, and relationship satisfaction each uniquely contributed to self-esteem. More importantly, multiple mediation analysis showed that authenticity and relationship satisfaction both mediated the effects of power on self-esteem, even when controlling for participants' communal orientation and social desirability. Our findings demonstrate that authenticity and relationship satisfaction represent two key mechanisms by which power is associated with self-esteem.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus