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The Response, Outcome and Toxicity of Aggressive Palliative Thoracic Radiotherapy for Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Controlled Extrathoracic Diseases.

Chiang Y, Yang JC, Hsu FM, Chen YH, Shih JY, Lin ZZ, Lan KH, Cheng AL, Kuo SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma or poorly-differentiated carcinoma had a higher ORR than those with adenocarcinoma (63% vs. 34%, P = 0.034).EGFR mutations was closely associated with a better ORR (45% vs. 29%, P = 0.284).At a median follow-up time of 44 months, the median OS, LRPFS after RT, and OS-RT were 50 months, 15 months, and 18 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: For metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with controlled extrathoracic disease after systemic treatment, stable or progressive primary lung lesions may cause respiratory symptoms and increase comorbidities. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether aggressive palliative thoracic radiotherapy (RT) can enhance local control and improve the survival for this subgroup of patients.

Materials and methods: Between March 2006 and December 2014, 56 patients with metastatic NSCLC who had responsive or stable extrathoracic diseases after chemotherapy and/or molecular targets, and received thoracic RT for stable and progressive primary lung lesions were included. RT with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 40-62 Gy) was administered in 1.8-2.5 Gy fractions to primary lung tumor and regional mediastinal lymph nodes using modern RT technique. Overall survival (OS) from diagnosis, and locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), and survival calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method.

Results: There were 37 men and 19 women with a median age of 60 years at diagnosis. The median interval from the diagnosis of metastatic disease to thoracic RT was 8 months. Following thoracic RT, 26 patients (46%) achieved complete or partial response (overall response rate, ORR). Patients with squamous cell carcinoma or poorly-differentiated carcinoma had a higher ORR than those with adenocarcinoma (63% vs. 34%, P = 0.034). EGFR mutations was closely associated with a better ORR (45% vs. 29%, P = 0.284). At a median follow-up time of 44 months, the median OS, LRPFS after RT, and OS-RT were 50 months, 15 months, and 18 months.

Conclusion: Radical palliative throractic RT is safe and might be beneficial for primary lung lesions of metastatic NSCLC patients with controlled extrathoracic diseases.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival rates of 56 patients receiving aggressive palliative thoracic RT.(A) Overall survival (OS) of all patients (B) Overall survival rate calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT).
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pone.0145936.g003: Survival rates of 56 patients receiving aggressive palliative thoracic RT.(A) Overall survival (OS) of all patients (B) Overall survival rate calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT).

Mentions: Thirty-five (63%) patients were alive after a median follow-up of 44 months (range: 6–113 months). Median interval from the diagnosis of metastatic disease to thoracic RT was 26 months (range, 1–81 months). Median OS (Fig 3A) and median OS-RT (Fig 3B) were 50 months and 18 months, respectively. The 5-year OS for total 56 patients was 43%, whereas 2-year OS-RT was 41%. The median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 15 months and 33%, respectively, for 56 patients. Among the 27 patients who received thoracic RT alone, the median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 12 months and 31%, respectively. Furthermore, the median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 18 months and 36%, respectively, in patients receiving combined systemic therapy and thoracic RT


The Response, Outcome and Toxicity of Aggressive Palliative Thoracic Radiotherapy for Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Controlled Extrathoracic Diseases.

Chiang Y, Yang JC, Hsu FM, Chen YH, Shih JY, Lin ZZ, Lan KH, Cheng AL, Kuo SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Survival rates of 56 patients receiving aggressive palliative thoracic RT.(A) Overall survival (OS) of all patients (B) Overall survival rate calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697816&req=5

pone.0145936.g003: Survival rates of 56 patients receiving aggressive palliative thoracic RT.(A) Overall survival (OS) of all patients (B) Overall survival rate calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT).
Mentions: Thirty-five (63%) patients were alive after a median follow-up of 44 months (range: 6–113 months). Median interval from the diagnosis of metastatic disease to thoracic RT was 26 months (range, 1–81 months). Median OS (Fig 3A) and median OS-RT (Fig 3B) were 50 months and 18 months, respectively. The 5-year OS for total 56 patients was 43%, whereas 2-year OS-RT was 41%. The median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 15 months and 33%, respectively, for 56 patients. Among the 27 patients who received thoracic RT alone, the median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 12 months and 31%, respectively. Furthermore, the median and 2-year LRPFS after the completion of RT were 18 months and 36%, respectively, in patients receiving combined systemic therapy and thoracic RT

Bottom Line: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma or poorly-differentiated carcinoma had a higher ORR than those with adenocarcinoma (63% vs. 34%, P = 0.034).EGFR mutations was closely associated with a better ORR (45% vs. 29%, P = 0.284).At a median follow-up time of 44 months, the median OS, LRPFS after RT, and OS-RT were 50 months, 15 months, and 18 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: For metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with controlled extrathoracic disease after systemic treatment, stable or progressive primary lung lesions may cause respiratory symptoms and increase comorbidities. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether aggressive palliative thoracic radiotherapy (RT) can enhance local control and improve the survival for this subgroup of patients.

Materials and methods: Between March 2006 and December 2014, 56 patients with metastatic NSCLC who had responsive or stable extrathoracic diseases after chemotherapy and/or molecular targets, and received thoracic RT for stable and progressive primary lung lesions were included. RT with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 40-62 Gy) was administered in 1.8-2.5 Gy fractions to primary lung tumor and regional mediastinal lymph nodes using modern RT technique. Overall survival (OS) from diagnosis, and locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), and survival calculated from radiotherapy (OS-RT) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method.

Results: There were 37 men and 19 women with a median age of 60 years at diagnosis. The median interval from the diagnosis of metastatic disease to thoracic RT was 8 months. Following thoracic RT, 26 patients (46%) achieved complete or partial response (overall response rate, ORR). Patients with squamous cell carcinoma or poorly-differentiated carcinoma had a higher ORR than those with adenocarcinoma (63% vs. 34%, P = 0.034). EGFR mutations was closely associated with a better ORR (45% vs. 29%, P = 0.284). At a median follow-up time of 44 months, the median OS, LRPFS after RT, and OS-RT were 50 months, 15 months, and 18 months.

Conclusion: Radical palliative throractic RT is safe and might be beneficial for primary lung lesions of metastatic NSCLC patients with controlled extrathoracic diseases.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus