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Relationship between variations in posterior vitreous detachment and visual prognosis in idiopathic epiretinal membranes.

Ota A, Tanaka Y, Toyoda F, Shimmura M, Kinoshita N, Takano H, Kakehashi A - Clin Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: The logMAR BCVA at the first visit was the worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.22±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (-0.019±0.07; P<0.01) and the C-PVD group (0.029±0.08; P<0.05).The logMAR BCVA 2 years later was also worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.39±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (0.04±0.13) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.03±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).The change in the logMAR BCVA over the 2-year follow-up period was worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.17±0.23) compared with the no-PVD group (0.06±0.14) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.0009±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Saitama Medical Center, Omiya-ku, Saitama, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To clarify the relationship between variations in posterior vitreous detachments (PVDs) and visual prognoses in idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs).

Methods: In this retrospective, observational, and consecutive case series, we observed variations in PVDs in 37 patients (mean age, 65.7±11.0 years) with ERMs and followed them for 2 years. Three PVD types were found biomicroscopically: no PVD, complete PVD with collapse (C-PVD with collapse), and partial PVD without shrinkage, with persistent vitreous attachment to the macula through the premacular hole of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD without shrinkage [M]). The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured and converted to the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) BCVA at the first visit and 2 years later.

Results: No PVD was observed in 16 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 61.3±11.3 years), C-PVD with collapse in 11 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 69.1±9.9 years), and P-PVD without shrinkage (M) in 10 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 69.3±10.9 years). The logMAR BCVA at the first visit was the worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.22±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (-0.019±0.07; P<0.01) and the C-PVD group (0.029±0.08; P<0.05). The logMAR BCVA 2 years later was also worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.39±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (0.04±0.13) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.03±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons). The change in the logMAR BCVA over the 2-year follow-up period was worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.17±0.23) compared with the no-PVD group (0.06±0.14) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.0009±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).

Conclusion: Cases with an ERM with a P-PVD without shrinkage (M) had a worse visual prognosis than those with an ERM with no PVD and C-PVD with collapse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A case of classic vitreomacular traction syndrome classified as partial posterior vitreous detachment with shrinkage.Note: A table top-type tractional retinal detachment is seen clearly by optical coherence tomography.Abbreviations: N, nasal; S, superior; T, temporal; I, inferior.
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f3-opth-10-007: A case of classic vitreomacular traction syndrome classified as partial posterior vitreous detachment with shrinkage.Note: A table top-type tractional retinal detachment is seen clearly by optical coherence tomography.Abbreviations: N, nasal; S, superior; T, temporal; I, inferior.

Mentions: The cases of the classic vitreomacular traction syndrome were classified as a P-PVD with shrinkage (Figure 3), which were excluded from the current study, because the visual prognosis of ERM cases with vitreomacular traction syndrome is not good and requires vitreous surgery.7,16,17 We need to determine the visual prognosis of the other types of idiopathic ERMs.


Relationship between variations in posterior vitreous detachment and visual prognosis in idiopathic epiretinal membranes.

Ota A, Tanaka Y, Toyoda F, Shimmura M, Kinoshita N, Takano H, Kakehashi A - Clin Ophthalmol (2015)

A case of classic vitreomacular traction syndrome classified as partial posterior vitreous detachment with shrinkage.Note: A table top-type tractional retinal detachment is seen clearly by optical coherence tomography.Abbreviations: N, nasal; S, superior; T, temporal; I, inferior.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697789&req=5

f3-opth-10-007: A case of classic vitreomacular traction syndrome classified as partial posterior vitreous detachment with shrinkage.Note: A table top-type tractional retinal detachment is seen clearly by optical coherence tomography.Abbreviations: N, nasal; S, superior; T, temporal; I, inferior.
Mentions: The cases of the classic vitreomacular traction syndrome were classified as a P-PVD with shrinkage (Figure 3), which were excluded from the current study, because the visual prognosis of ERM cases with vitreomacular traction syndrome is not good and requires vitreous surgery.7,16,17 We need to determine the visual prognosis of the other types of idiopathic ERMs.

Bottom Line: The logMAR BCVA at the first visit was the worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.22±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (-0.019±0.07; P<0.01) and the C-PVD group (0.029±0.08; P<0.05).The logMAR BCVA 2 years later was also worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.39±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (0.04±0.13) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.03±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).The change in the logMAR BCVA over the 2-year follow-up period was worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.17±0.23) compared with the no-PVD group (0.06±0.14) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.0009±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Saitama Medical Center, Omiya-ku, Saitama, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To clarify the relationship between variations in posterior vitreous detachments (PVDs) and visual prognoses in idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs).

Methods: In this retrospective, observational, and consecutive case series, we observed variations in PVDs in 37 patients (mean age, 65.7±11.0 years) with ERMs and followed them for 2 years. Three PVD types were found biomicroscopically: no PVD, complete PVD with collapse (C-PVD with collapse), and partial PVD without shrinkage, with persistent vitreous attachment to the macula through the premacular hole of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD without shrinkage [M]). The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured and converted to the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) BCVA at the first visit and 2 years later.

Results: No PVD was observed in 16 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 61.3±11.3 years), C-PVD with collapse in 11 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 69.1±9.9 years), and P-PVD without shrinkage (M) in 10 of the 37 eyes (mean age, 69.3±10.9 years). The logMAR BCVA at the first visit was the worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.22±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (-0.019±0.07; P<0.01) and the C-PVD group (0.029±0.08; P<0.05). The logMAR BCVA 2 years later was also worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.39±0.35) compared with the no-PVD group (0.04±0.13) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.03±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons). The change in the logMAR BCVA over the 2-year follow-up period was worst in the P-PVD without shrinkage (M) group (0.17±0.23) compared with the no-PVD group (0.06±0.14) and the C-PVD with collapse group (0.0009±0.09; P<0.05 for both comparisons).

Conclusion: Cases with an ERM with a P-PVD without shrinkage (M) had a worse visual prognosis than those with an ERM with no PVD and C-PVD with collapse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus