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Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization.

Lee HS - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Bottom Line: The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°.In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise.These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology and Medical Science, Graduate School, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

No MeSH data available.


Pelvic stabilization mechanisms on the lumbar extension exercise dynamometer.
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f1-jer-11-6-372: Pelvic stabilization mechanisms on the lumbar extension exercise dynamometer.

Mentions: Isometric lumbar extensor strength test and dynamic exercise sessions separated by one week were required. Isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise were using a lumbar extension exercise system (LEX; Daeyang Mechanics, Seoul, Korea) between pelvic stabilized and unstabilized conditions. Isometric lumbar extension strength values were used to collect the EMG data and to determine the load for the dynamic exercise. Subjects were seated in the LEX in an upright position in order to isometric lumbar extension strength test with pelvic stabilized condition. The knees were positioned so that the thighs were parallel to the seat. The lower legs were placed in the leg support and fixed a lower leg restraint pad. The anterior portion of the thigh and pelvic were secured with the thigh-pelvic restraint pad over the anterior thigh and pelvis (Fig. 1). Next, passive lumbar ranges of motion in the sagittal plane and centers of torso mass were determined. Then, the subjects performed a series of submaximal isometric strength tests and light dynamic exercise for familiarization to the device. After a 15-min rest period, the subjects were positioned in the lumbar dynamometer as described above, maximum voluntary isometric lumbar extension torque output was measured at three positions at 110°, 146°, and 182° of lumbar extension. When ready to test, the subject was requested to build up to maximal tension over 2–3 sec and to maintain the contraction for a further 1 sec with rest interval 10 sec between each angle. During the test, the subjects were verbally encouraged to generate maximum torque (Graves et al., 1994). Isometric lumbar extension strength test in the unstabilized pelvic position was performed in similar condition to that the stabilized pelvic position. However, movement of the pelvis was restricted that the thigh-pelvic restraint pad, leg support and leg restraint pad were not used.


Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization.

Lee HS - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Pelvic stabilization mechanisms on the lumbar extension exercise dynamometer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697788&req=5

f1-jer-11-6-372: Pelvic stabilization mechanisms on the lumbar extension exercise dynamometer.
Mentions: Isometric lumbar extensor strength test and dynamic exercise sessions separated by one week were required. Isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise were using a lumbar extension exercise system (LEX; Daeyang Mechanics, Seoul, Korea) between pelvic stabilized and unstabilized conditions. Isometric lumbar extension strength values were used to collect the EMG data and to determine the load for the dynamic exercise. Subjects were seated in the LEX in an upright position in order to isometric lumbar extension strength test with pelvic stabilized condition. The knees were positioned so that the thighs were parallel to the seat. The lower legs were placed in the leg support and fixed a lower leg restraint pad. The anterior portion of the thigh and pelvic were secured with the thigh-pelvic restraint pad over the anterior thigh and pelvis (Fig. 1). Next, passive lumbar ranges of motion in the sagittal plane and centers of torso mass were determined. Then, the subjects performed a series of submaximal isometric strength tests and light dynamic exercise for familiarization to the device. After a 15-min rest period, the subjects were positioned in the lumbar dynamometer as described above, maximum voluntary isometric lumbar extension torque output was measured at three positions at 110°, 146°, and 182° of lumbar extension. When ready to test, the subject was requested to build up to maximal tension over 2–3 sec and to maintain the contraction for a further 1 sec with rest interval 10 sec between each angle. During the test, the subjects were verbally encouraged to generate maximum torque (Graves et al., 1994). Isometric lumbar extension strength test in the unstabilized pelvic position was performed in similar condition to that the stabilized pelvic position. However, movement of the pelvis was restricted that the thigh-pelvic restraint pad, leg support and leg restraint pad were not used.

Bottom Line: The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°.In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise.These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology and Medical Science, Graduate School, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

No MeSH data available.