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Treadmill exercise alleviates chronic mild stress-induced depression in rats.

Lee TH, Kim K, Shin MS, Kim CJ, Lim BV - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Bottom Line: The animals in the CMS groups were exposed to the CMS conditions for 8 weeks and those in the control group were exposed to the control conditions for 8 weeks.Treadmill exercise restored sucrose consumption, increased cell proliferation, and decreased apoptotic cell death.The present results suggest the possibility that exercise may improve symptoms of depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Dae Dong Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Depression is a major cause of disability and one of the most common public health problems. In the present study, antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise on chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression in rats was investigated. For this, sucrose intake test, immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining, and Western blot analysis for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were conducted. Following adaptation to the animal vivarium and two baseline fluid intake tests, the animals were divided into four groups: the control group, the CMS-induced depression group, the CMS-induced depression and exercise group, and the CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. The animals in the CMS groups were exposed to the CMS conditions for 8 weeks and those in the control group were exposed to the control conditions for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks of CMS, the rats in the CMS-induced depression and exercise group were made to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. In the present results, treadmill exercise alleviated CMS-induced depressive symptoms. Treadmill exercise restored sucrose consumption, increased cell proliferation, and decreased apoptotic cell death. The present results suggest the possibility that exercise may improve symptoms of depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of exercise on sucrose intake. () Control group, () chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression group, () CMS-induced depression and exercise group, () CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. Letters (a, b) mean statistical significance P<0.05.
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f1-jer-11-6-303: Effect of exercise on sucrose intake. () Control group, () chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression group, () CMS-induced depression and exercise group, () CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. Letters (a, b) mean statistical significance P<0.05.

Mentions: Sucrose intake was decreased in the rats of the CMS-induced group, however, sucrose intake was restored in the rats of the CMS-induced depression and exercise group and in the CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group (Fig. 1).


Treadmill exercise alleviates chronic mild stress-induced depression in rats.

Lee TH, Kim K, Shin MS, Kim CJ, Lim BV - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Effect of exercise on sucrose intake. () Control group, () chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression group, () CMS-induced depression and exercise group, () CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. Letters (a, b) mean statistical significance P<0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697778&req=5

f1-jer-11-6-303: Effect of exercise on sucrose intake. () Control group, () chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression group, () CMS-induced depression and exercise group, () CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. Letters (a, b) mean statistical significance P<0.05.
Mentions: Sucrose intake was decreased in the rats of the CMS-induced group, however, sucrose intake was restored in the rats of the CMS-induced depression and exercise group and in the CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The animals in the CMS groups were exposed to the CMS conditions for 8 weeks and those in the control group were exposed to the control conditions for 8 weeks.Treadmill exercise restored sucrose consumption, increased cell proliferation, and decreased apoptotic cell death.The present results suggest the possibility that exercise may improve symptoms of depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Dae Dong Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Depression is a major cause of disability and one of the most common public health problems. In the present study, antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise on chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression in rats was investigated. For this, sucrose intake test, immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining, and Western blot analysis for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were conducted. Following adaptation to the animal vivarium and two baseline fluid intake tests, the animals were divided into four groups: the control group, the CMS-induced depression group, the CMS-induced depression and exercise group, and the CMS-induced depression and fluoxetine-treated group. The animals in the CMS groups were exposed to the CMS conditions for 8 weeks and those in the control group were exposed to the control conditions for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks of CMS, the rats in the CMS-induced depression and exercise group were made to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. In the present results, treadmill exercise alleviated CMS-induced depressive symptoms. Treadmill exercise restored sucrose consumption, increased cell proliferation, and decreased apoptotic cell death. The present results suggest the possibility that exercise may improve symptoms of depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus