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Childhood family disruption and adult height: is there a mediating role of puberty?

Sheppard P, Garcia JR, Sear R - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Later puberty was associated with shorter adult height.WOMEN: the father's death during early childhood was associated with earlier puberty, which was in turn associated with shorter adult stature.Early childhood familial disruption is associated with shorter height for men, and is partially mediated by later puberty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HE, UK; The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; paula.sheppard@lshtm.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the mechanisms underlying the theoretical model in Fig. 1. Diagram kindly contributed by Meredith Reiches
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eov028-F2: Schematic representation of the mechanisms underlying the theoretical model in Fig. 1. Diagram kindly contributed by Meredith Reiches

Mentions: For females, childhood disruption is associated with accelerated age at menarche in non-nutritionally stressed populations. This is attributed to the psychological stress response that reduces levels of anabolic hormones like androgen which promote skeletal growth and lean tissue, but are associated with less adipose fat [15] (Fig. 1, first upper arrow). Elevated cortisol is also a consequence of stress, which increases insulin production, and together they produce higher levels of fatty tissue [15]. Increased fatty weight gain during adolescence expedites female puberty. Earlier age at puberty results in taller stature at the time but ultimately these women tend to attain shorter adult height than their later-maturing peers because of their shorter period of growth [14] (Fig. 1, second upper arrow). Figure 2 shows the hormonal pathways that underlie the theoretical model shown in Fig. 1.Figure 2.


Childhood family disruption and adult height: is there a mediating role of puberty?

Sheppard P, Garcia JR, Sear R - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Schematic representation of the mechanisms underlying the theoretical model in Fig. 1. Diagram kindly contributed by Meredith Reiches
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697772&req=5

eov028-F2: Schematic representation of the mechanisms underlying the theoretical model in Fig. 1. Diagram kindly contributed by Meredith Reiches
Mentions: For females, childhood disruption is associated with accelerated age at menarche in non-nutritionally stressed populations. This is attributed to the psychological stress response that reduces levels of anabolic hormones like androgen which promote skeletal growth and lean tissue, but are associated with less adipose fat [15] (Fig. 1, first upper arrow). Elevated cortisol is also a consequence of stress, which increases insulin production, and together they produce higher levels of fatty tissue [15]. Increased fatty weight gain during adolescence expedites female puberty. Earlier age at puberty results in taller stature at the time but ultimately these women tend to attain shorter adult height than their later-maturing peers because of their shorter period of growth [14] (Fig. 1, second upper arrow). Figure 2 shows the hormonal pathways that underlie the theoretical model shown in Fig. 1.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Later puberty was associated with shorter adult height.WOMEN: the father's death during early childhood was associated with earlier puberty, which was in turn associated with shorter adult stature.Early childhood familial disruption is associated with shorter height for men, and is partially mediated by later puberty.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HE, UK; The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; paula.sheppard@lshtm.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.