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Effects of wildfire disaster exposure on male birth weight in an Australian population.

O'Donnell MH, Behie AM - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that male infants born in the most severely fire-affected area had significantly higher average birth weights than their less exposed peers and were also heavier than males born in the same areas in non-fire years.There was no significant effect on the weight of female infants or on gestational age for either sex.Like previous studies, our work finds effects of disaster exposure and suggests that fetal growth patterns respond to maternal signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Archaeology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Social Sciences, the Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia u5037508@anu.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Means for birth weight arising from ANOVA analysis of males (only) at three levels of estimated fire exposure between 2002 and 2004, with the fire and fire aftermath (2003) shown by the shaded area. Babies born between the fire (18 January) and March 2003 are estimated to be exposed in the third trimester, those born between April 2003 and June 2003 as exposed in the second trimester and those born between July 2003 and September 2003 as exposed in the first trimester. Babies born between October 2003 and December 2003 would have been conceived in the fire aftermath
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eov027-F1: Means for birth weight arising from ANOVA analysis of males (only) at three levels of estimated fire exposure between 2002 and 2004, with the fire and fire aftermath (2003) shown by the shaded area. Babies born between the fire (18 January) and March 2003 are estimated to be exposed in the third trimester, those born between April 2003 and June 2003 as exposed in the second trimester and those born between July 2003 and September 2003 as exposed in the first trimester. Babies born between October 2003 and December 2003 would have been conceived in the fire aftermath

Mentions: The analysis of males born in 2003 (the year of the fire) showed that being in the severely affected area in the year of the fire was only significant for male offspring (F = 5.73, P = 0.003, df = 2). A further ANOVA which included data from all years indicates that exposed male neonates were heavier throughout 2003 than males born to mothers residing in the same areas in the previous and following years (F-value = 1.58, P = 0.01, df = 2), as well as being heavier than males born elsewhere during 2003 (Fig. 1). Males born to mothers who resided in severely affected areas had a predicted mean birth weight of 3657 g, compared with 3460 g for those born to mothers in affected areas and 3454 g for those born to mothers in unaffected areas.


Effects of wildfire disaster exposure on male birth weight in an Australian population.

O'Donnell MH, Behie AM - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Means for birth weight arising from ANOVA analysis of males (only) at three levels of estimated fire exposure between 2002 and 2004, with the fire and fire aftermath (2003) shown by the shaded area. Babies born between the fire (18 January) and March 2003 are estimated to be exposed in the third trimester, those born between April 2003 and June 2003 as exposed in the second trimester and those born between July 2003 and September 2003 as exposed in the first trimester. Babies born between October 2003 and December 2003 would have been conceived in the fire aftermath
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697771&req=5

eov027-F1: Means for birth weight arising from ANOVA analysis of males (only) at three levels of estimated fire exposure between 2002 and 2004, with the fire and fire aftermath (2003) shown by the shaded area. Babies born between the fire (18 January) and March 2003 are estimated to be exposed in the third trimester, those born between April 2003 and June 2003 as exposed in the second trimester and those born between July 2003 and September 2003 as exposed in the first trimester. Babies born between October 2003 and December 2003 would have been conceived in the fire aftermath
Mentions: The analysis of males born in 2003 (the year of the fire) showed that being in the severely affected area in the year of the fire was only significant for male offspring (F = 5.73, P = 0.003, df = 2). A further ANOVA which included data from all years indicates that exposed male neonates were heavier throughout 2003 than males born to mothers residing in the same areas in the previous and following years (F-value = 1.58, P = 0.01, df = 2), as well as being heavier than males born elsewhere during 2003 (Fig. 1). Males born to mothers who resided in severely affected areas had a predicted mean birth weight of 3657 g, compared with 3460 g for those born to mothers in affected areas and 3454 g for those born to mothers in unaffected areas.

Bottom Line: We found that male infants born in the most severely fire-affected area had significantly higher average birth weights than their less exposed peers and were also heavier than males born in the same areas in non-fire years.There was no significant effect on the weight of female infants or on gestational age for either sex.Like previous studies, our work finds effects of disaster exposure and suggests that fetal growth patterns respond to maternal signals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Archaeology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Social Sciences, the Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia u5037508@anu.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus