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Using phase response curves to predict synchronization times for neural circuits

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The mean value of the STDM divided by the period (the combination is dimensionless) as a function of the h and persistent sodium conductances in the stellate cell, which are the parameters most influencing the intrinsic spiking frequency. The region of maximal values (red) is approximately in the θ and low-β region of intrinsic spiking frequency, and also approximately the frequency range where circuits of simulated cells are observed to synchronize most quickly and where real stellate cells lie. The results shown are for excitatory coupling with synaptic conductance 0.01 mS / cm2.
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Figure 1: The mean value of the STDM divided by the period (the combination is dimensionless) as a function of the h and persistent sodium conductances in the stellate cell, which are the parameters most influencing the intrinsic spiking frequency. The region of maximal values (red) is approximately in the θ and low-β region of intrinsic spiking frequency, and also approximately the frequency range where circuits of simulated cells are observed to synchronize most quickly and where real stellate cells lie. The results shown are for excitatory coupling with synaptic conductance 0.01 mS / cm2.

Mentions: The spike-time difference map (STDM) formalism of [2] uses the phase response curves (PRCs) of two identical coupled cells to predict the existence and stability of synchronized and other steady-state firing patterns. The STDM is an iterate of the PRC which gives the amount by which the time between corresponding spikes in the two cells changes from one cycle to the next. By taking the mean value of the STDM and dividing by the period, which gives essentially the mean "rate" at which the spike time difference is changing, we find a prominent band of maxima in the same frequency region as the synchronization time minima (Fig. 1). Like the synchronization time minimization, the existence and location of this region of maxima appears to be relatively insensitive to synaptic coupling strength and excitatory versus inhibitory coupling. Thus, the STDM may provide the basis for a semi-analytical approach for finding the regions of parameter space most favorable for synchronization time.


Using phase response curves to predict synchronization times for neural circuits
The mean value of the STDM divided by the period (the combination is dimensionless) as a function of the h and persistent sodium conductances in the stellate cell, which are the parameters most influencing the intrinsic spiking frequency. The region of maximal values (red) is approximately in the θ and low-β region of intrinsic spiking frequency, and also approximately the frequency range where circuits of simulated cells are observed to synchronize most quickly and where real stellate cells lie. The results shown are for excitatory coupling with synaptic conductance 0.01 mS / cm2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697470&req=5

Figure 1: The mean value of the STDM divided by the period (the combination is dimensionless) as a function of the h and persistent sodium conductances in the stellate cell, which are the parameters most influencing the intrinsic spiking frequency. The region of maximal values (red) is approximately in the θ and low-β region of intrinsic spiking frequency, and also approximately the frequency range where circuits of simulated cells are observed to synchronize most quickly and where real stellate cells lie. The results shown are for excitatory coupling with synaptic conductance 0.01 mS / cm2.
Mentions: The spike-time difference map (STDM) formalism of [2] uses the phase response curves (PRCs) of two identical coupled cells to predict the existence and stability of synchronized and other steady-state firing patterns. The STDM is an iterate of the PRC which gives the amount by which the time between corresponding spikes in the two cells changes from one cycle to the next. By taking the mean value of the STDM and dividing by the period, which gives essentially the mean "rate" at which the spike time difference is changing, we find a prominent band of maxima in the same frequency region as the synchronization time minima (Fig. 1). Like the synchronization time minimization, the existence and location of this region of maxima appears to be relatively insensitive to synaptic coupling strength and excitatory versus inhibitory coupling. Thus, the STDM may provide the basis for a semi-analytical approach for finding the regions of parameter space most favorable for synchronization time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.