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Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal.

Bui TP, Ritari J, Boeren S, de Waard P, Plugge CM, de Vos WM - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate.The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine.Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

L-lysine and fructoselysine conversion by strain Intestinimonas AF211 throughout time.Carbon recovery was 87% and 101% for the lysine (a) and fructoselysine (b) utilization, respectively. Exact concentrations of substrates and products and optical density values are included in Supplementary Table 1. Values are mean of biological duplicates. Error bars indicate s.d.
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f1: L-lysine and fructoselysine conversion by strain Intestinimonas AF211 throughout time.Carbon recovery was 87% and 101% for the lysine (a) and fructoselysine (b) utilization, respectively. Exact concentrations of substrates and products and optical density values are included in Supplementary Table 1. Values are mean of biological duplicates. Error bars indicate s.d.

Mentions: To study the capacity to convert lysine into butyrate, Intestinimonas AF211 was grown in bicarbonate-buffered medium containing L-lysine as the sole carbon and energy source. A total of 16.8±0.4 mM lysine was converted into 14.2±0.6 mM butyrate, 15.6±0.7 mM acetate and 22.1±0.5 mM NH3 when the cells reached the stationary phase after 2 days at 37 °C (Fig. 1a). This suggests that part of the released ammonia is sequestered into proteins during anabolism of Intestinimonas AF211. Hence, we propose the fermentation reaction as: C6H14O2N2+2H2O→C4H8O2+C2H4O2+2NH3. Clearly, Intestinimonas AF211 is capable of growing in defined media with L-lysine as sole carbon and energy source with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h−1.


Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal.

Bui TP, Ritari J, Boeren S, de Waard P, Plugge CM, de Vos WM - Nat Commun (2015)

L-lysine and fructoselysine conversion by strain Intestinimonas AF211 throughout time.Carbon recovery was 87% and 101% for the lysine (a) and fructoselysine (b) utilization, respectively. Exact concentrations of substrates and products and optical density values are included in Supplementary Table 1. Values are mean of biological duplicates. Error bars indicate s.d.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697335&req=5

f1: L-lysine and fructoselysine conversion by strain Intestinimonas AF211 throughout time.Carbon recovery was 87% and 101% for the lysine (a) and fructoselysine (b) utilization, respectively. Exact concentrations of substrates and products and optical density values are included in Supplementary Table 1. Values are mean of biological duplicates. Error bars indicate s.d.
Mentions: To study the capacity to convert lysine into butyrate, Intestinimonas AF211 was grown in bicarbonate-buffered medium containing L-lysine as the sole carbon and energy source. A total of 16.8±0.4 mM lysine was converted into 14.2±0.6 mM butyrate, 15.6±0.7 mM acetate and 22.1±0.5 mM NH3 when the cells reached the stationary phase after 2 days at 37 °C (Fig. 1a). This suggests that part of the released ammonia is sequestered into proteins during anabolism of Intestinimonas AF211. Hence, we propose the fermentation reaction as: C6H14O2N2+2H2O→C4H8O2+C2H4O2+2NH3. Clearly, Intestinimonas AF211 is capable of growing in defined media with L-lysine as sole carbon and energy source with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h−1.

Bottom Line: Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate.The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine.Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus