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Factors associated with development of gastrointestinal problems in patients with scleroderma: a systematic review.

Hong BY, Giang R, Mbuagbaw L, Larche M, Thabane L - Syst Rev (2015)

Bottom Line: These problems significantly impair quality of life.We found conflicting evidence on the role of H. pylori with two studies showing opposite yet statistically significant results.One moderate quality study showed smoking as a risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. brian.youn.hong@learnlink.mcmaster.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up to 90% of people with scleroderma have gastrointestinal (GI) problems such as constipation, bloating, diarrhea, and malabsorption. These problems significantly impair quality of life. Our objective was to determine the risk factors for gastrointestinal issues in people with scleroderma.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review of observational studies that report GI problems in patients with scleroderma along with the associated risk factors. We were interested in any GI problem and any risk factor as long as the study included patients diagnosed with scleroderma according to the 1980 or 2013 American College of Rheumatology guideline. We searched the following databases: CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, and Web of Science for relevant articles from June 1884 to May 2014. Two authors independently screened citations and full text articles and extracted data. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus or by consulting a third author. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.

Results: After removing duplicates, 645 unique citations were identified. A total of three studies, three cross-sectional (n = 64, n = 42, n = 606), were included in this systematic review. Collectively, these three studies explored Helicobacter pylori and smoking status as risk factors. We found conflicting evidence on the role of H. pylori with two studies showing opposite yet statistically significant results. One moderate quality study showed smoking as a risk factor. Key limitations include the small sample sizes of two studies and poor study designs to draw causal links.

Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to describe the risk factors for GI problems in patients with scleroderma. Longitudinal observational studies are warranted in patients with scleroderma.

Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42014010707.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of study selection
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Fig1: Flow diagram of study selection

Mentions: Our electronic literature search identified a total of 645 unique citations after duplicates were removed. One study was identified by searching the reference lists of included studies, but was excluded from this review. Title and abstract screening identified 235 articles that were potentially eligible for inclusion. During the full text screening, 232 citations were removed resulting in a total of three studies being included [24–26]. Figure 1 provides a flow diagram of the study selection process and the reasons for exclusion.Fig. 1


Factors associated with development of gastrointestinal problems in patients with scleroderma: a systematic review.

Hong BY, Giang R, Mbuagbaw L, Larche M, Thabane L - Syst Rev (2015)

Flow diagram of study selection
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697318&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram of study selection
Mentions: Our electronic literature search identified a total of 645 unique citations after duplicates were removed. One study was identified by searching the reference lists of included studies, but was excluded from this review. Title and abstract screening identified 235 articles that were potentially eligible for inclusion. During the full text screening, 232 citations were removed resulting in a total of three studies being included [24–26]. Figure 1 provides a flow diagram of the study selection process and the reasons for exclusion.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: These problems significantly impair quality of life.We found conflicting evidence on the role of H. pylori with two studies showing opposite yet statistically significant results.One moderate quality study showed smoking as a risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. brian.youn.hong@learnlink.mcmaster.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Up to 90% of people with scleroderma have gastrointestinal (GI) problems such as constipation, bloating, diarrhea, and malabsorption. These problems significantly impair quality of life. Our objective was to determine the risk factors for gastrointestinal issues in people with scleroderma.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review of observational studies that report GI problems in patients with scleroderma along with the associated risk factors. We were interested in any GI problem and any risk factor as long as the study included patients diagnosed with scleroderma according to the 1980 or 2013 American College of Rheumatology guideline. We searched the following databases: CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, and Web of Science for relevant articles from June 1884 to May 2014. Two authors independently screened citations and full text articles and extracted data. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus or by consulting a third author. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.

Results: After removing duplicates, 645 unique citations were identified. A total of three studies, three cross-sectional (n = 64, n = 42, n = 606), were included in this systematic review. Collectively, these three studies explored Helicobacter pylori and smoking status as risk factors. We found conflicting evidence on the role of H. pylori with two studies showing opposite yet statistically significant results. One moderate quality study showed smoking as a risk factor. Key limitations include the small sample sizes of two studies and poor study designs to draw causal links.

Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to describe the risk factors for GI problems in patients with scleroderma. Longitudinal observational studies are warranted in patients with scleroderma.

Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42014010707.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus