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Malaria rapid diagnostic test in children: The Zamfara, Nigeria experience.

Abdulkadir I, Rufai HA, Ochapa SO, Malam MS, Garba BI, Oloko AG, George II - Niger Med J (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Three-quarter (79%) of the children received inappropriate nonrecommended antimalaria prior to their presentation, including 20% who received chloroquine.The overall sensitivity of RDT was 40.3%.The specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 89.6%, 81.8%, and 56.5%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Malaria remains a major cause of under-five morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, and prompt diagnosis occupies a strategic position in its management. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT), a nontechnical, easy to perform test promises to meet this need. It is important to locally document the usefulness of the use of RDT in making prompt malaria diagnosis in children.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of malaria and evaluate the diagnostic performance of malaria RDT kit in febrile under-five children presenting to a Tertiary Health Facility in Gusau, North-Western Nigeria.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study of children aged 6-59 months, evaluated for malaria in a tertiary health facility from August 2012 to January 2013. Information was obtained from care providers of all subjects with fever and a presumptive diagnosis of malaria. All subjects were investigated using Giemsa stain microscopy and Carestartâ„¢ malaria RDT.

Results: The prevalence of malaria in 250 febrile under-five children was 54%. Three-quarter (79%) of the children received inappropriate nonrecommended antimalaria prior to their presentation, including 20% who received chloroquine. The overall sensitivity of RDT was 40.3%. The specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 89.6%, 81.8%, and 56.5%, respectively.

Conclusion: Use of RDT should be encouraged for screening and diagnosis using a protocol such that febrile children with positive RDT results are confirmed as having malaria while those with negative results are further evaluated using microscopy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Medications received by subjects before presentation to Federal Medical Centre
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Figure 1: Medications received by subjects before presentation to Federal Medical Centre

Mentions: One hundred and forty-two (57%) of the subjects had received some form of antimalarial treatment before presentation and of these, 21% have received ACT [Figure 1], whereas the remaining majority (79%) received other nonrecommended antimalarials.


Malaria rapid diagnostic test in children: The Zamfara, Nigeria experience.

Abdulkadir I, Rufai HA, Ochapa SO, Malam MS, Garba BI, Oloko AG, George II - Niger Med J (2015 Jul-Aug)

Medications received by subjects before presentation to Federal Medical Centre
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697217&req=5

Figure 1: Medications received by subjects before presentation to Federal Medical Centre
Mentions: One hundred and forty-two (57%) of the subjects had received some form of antimalarial treatment before presentation and of these, 21% have received ACT [Figure 1], whereas the remaining majority (79%) received other nonrecommended antimalarials.

Bottom Line: Three-quarter (79%) of the children received inappropriate nonrecommended antimalaria prior to their presentation, including 20% who received chloroquine.The overall sensitivity of RDT was 40.3%.The specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 89.6%, 81.8%, and 56.5%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatrics, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Malaria remains a major cause of under-five morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, and prompt diagnosis occupies a strategic position in its management. Malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT), a nontechnical, easy to perform test promises to meet this need. It is important to locally document the usefulness of the use of RDT in making prompt malaria diagnosis in children.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of malaria and evaluate the diagnostic performance of malaria RDT kit in febrile under-five children presenting to a Tertiary Health Facility in Gusau, North-Western Nigeria.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study of children aged 6-59 months, evaluated for malaria in a tertiary health facility from August 2012 to January 2013. Information was obtained from care providers of all subjects with fever and a presumptive diagnosis of malaria. All subjects were investigated using Giemsa stain microscopy and Carestartâ„¢ malaria RDT.

Results: The prevalence of malaria in 250 febrile under-five children was 54%. Three-quarter (79%) of the children received inappropriate nonrecommended antimalaria prior to their presentation, including 20% who received chloroquine. The overall sensitivity of RDT was 40.3%. The specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 89.6%, 81.8%, and 56.5%, respectively.

Conclusion: Use of RDT should be encouraged for screening and diagnosis using a protocol such that febrile children with positive RDT results are confirmed as having malaria while those with negative results are further evaluated using microscopy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus