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Tachycardia-Induced Right Heart Failure and Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation That Improved with Medication.

Yang YA, Yang DH, Kim HN, Kwon SH, Jang SY, Bae MH, Lee JH, Chae SC - Chonnam Med J (2015)

Bottom Line: It is reported that once the tricuspid annulus is dilated, its size cannot spontaneously return to normal, and it may continue to dilate.These reports also suggest the use of an aggressive surgical approach for secondary TR.In the present report, we describe a case of tachycardia-induced severe TR that was completely resolved without the need for surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Secondary tricuspid regurgitation (TR) primarily develops due to left heart failure or primary pulmonary diseases. Tricuspid annular dilation, which is commonly caused by right ventricular volume and pressure overload followed by right ventricle dilation, is believed to be the main mechanism underlying secondary TR. It is reported that once the tricuspid annulus is dilated, its size cannot spontaneously return to normal, and it may continue to dilate. These reports also suggest the use of an aggressive surgical approach for secondary TR. In the present report, we describe a case of tachycardia-induced severe TR that was completely resolved without the need for surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) An apical four-chamber image showing significantly decreased sizes of the right ventricle and atrium compared to sizes on the previous images (Fig. 2). (B) A color Doppler image showing a marked reduction of the tricuspid regurgitation flow. (C) Image showing reduction of the tricuspid annulus dilation to 3.23 cm. (D) Hepatic vein Doppler image showing no systolic reversal flow.
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Figure 3: (A) An apical four-chamber image showing significantly decreased sizes of the right ventricle and atrium compared to sizes on the previous images (Fig. 2). (B) A color Doppler image showing a marked reduction of the tricuspid regurgitation flow. (C) Image showing reduction of the tricuspid annulus dilation to 3.23 cm. (D) Hepatic vein Doppler image showing no systolic reversal flow.

Mentions: Echocardiography after 6 months of treatment surprisingly showed complete resolution of the TR. The tricuspid annulus diameter had decreased (tricuspid annular diameter, 3.23 cm) and the right atrial dimension had decreased as well (Fig. 3). Coronary angiography, which was performed to exclude ischemic etiology, showed no significant stenosis. Moreover, no pulmonary hypertension was noted on cardiac catheterization.


Tachycardia-Induced Right Heart Failure and Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation That Improved with Medication.

Yang YA, Yang DH, Kim HN, Kwon SH, Jang SY, Bae MH, Lee JH, Chae SC - Chonnam Med J (2015)

(A) An apical four-chamber image showing significantly decreased sizes of the right ventricle and atrium compared to sizes on the previous images (Fig. 2). (B) A color Doppler image showing a marked reduction of the tricuspid regurgitation flow. (C) Image showing reduction of the tricuspid annulus dilation to 3.23 cm. (D) Hepatic vein Doppler image showing no systolic reversal flow.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697114&req=5

Figure 3: (A) An apical four-chamber image showing significantly decreased sizes of the right ventricle and atrium compared to sizes on the previous images (Fig. 2). (B) A color Doppler image showing a marked reduction of the tricuspid regurgitation flow. (C) Image showing reduction of the tricuspid annulus dilation to 3.23 cm. (D) Hepatic vein Doppler image showing no systolic reversal flow.
Mentions: Echocardiography after 6 months of treatment surprisingly showed complete resolution of the TR. The tricuspid annulus diameter had decreased (tricuspid annular diameter, 3.23 cm) and the right atrial dimension had decreased as well (Fig. 3). Coronary angiography, which was performed to exclude ischemic etiology, showed no significant stenosis. Moreover, no pulmonary hypertension was noted on cardiac catheterization.

Bottom Line: It is reported that once the tricuspid annulus is dilated, its size cannot spontaneously return to normal, and it may continue to dilate.These reports also suggest the use of an aggressive surgical approach for secondary TR.In the present report, we describe a case of tachycardia-induced severe TR that was completely resolved without the need for surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Secondary tricuspid regurgitation (TR) primarily develops due to left heart failure or primary pulmonary diseases. Tricuspid annular dilation, which is commonly caused by right ventricular volume and pressure overload followed by right ventricle dilation, is believed to be the main mechanism underlying secondary TR. It is reported that once the tricuspid annulus is dilated, its size cannot spontaneously return to normal, and it may continue to dilate. These reports also suggest the use of an aggressive surgical approach for secondary TR. In the present report, we describe a case of tachycardia-induced severe TR that was completely resolved without the need for surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus