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Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression.

Andersen AH, Smith CD, Slevin JT, Kryscio RJ, Martin CA, Schmitt FA, Blonder LX - Parkinsons Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status.DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs.Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA; Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maps thresholded at the same level of statistical significance (P < 0.001) showing medication-related variations in the response patterns among depressed and nondepressed PD patients.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Maps thresholded at the same level of statistical significance (P < 0.001) showing medication-related variations in the response patterns among depressed and nondepressed PD patients.

Mentions: Pronounced differences in levels of deactivation of the midline default-mode network as a function of depression and dopaminergic medication status are readily apparent (see Figure 1).


Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression.

Andersen AH, Smith CD, Slevin JT, Kryscio RJ, Martin CA, Schmitt FA, Blonder LX - Parkinsons Dis (2015)

Maps thresholded at the same level of statistical significance (P < 0.001) showing medication-related variations in the response patterns among depressed and nondepressed PD patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697088&req=5

fig1: Maps thresholded at the same level of statistical significance (P < 0.001) showing medication-related variations in the response patterns among depressed and nondepressed PD patients.
Mentions: Pronounced differences in levels of deactivation of the midline default-mode network as a function of depression and dopaminergic medication status are readily apparent (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status.DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs.Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA; Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus