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Geographic, Racial/Ethnic, and Sociodemographic Disparities in Parent-Reported Receipt of Family-Centered Care among US Children.

Azuine RE, Singh GK, Ghandour RM, Kogan MD - Int J Family Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on parent report, 33.4% of US children did not receive FCC.Children from low-education and low-income households had a higher likelihood of not receiving FCC.The clustering of children who did not receive FCC and its components in several Southern and Western US states, as well as children from poor, uninsured, and publicly insured and of minority background, is a cause for concern in the face of federal policies to reduce health care disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10-77, Rockville, MD 20857, USA.

ABSTRACT
This study examined geographic, racial/ethnic, and sociodemographic disparities in parental reporting of receipt of family-centered care (FCC) and its components among US children aged 0-17 years. We used the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health to estimate the prevalence and odds of not receiving FCC by covariates. Based on parent report, 33.4% of US children did not receive FCC. Children in Arizona, Mississippi, Nevada, California, New Jersey, Virginia, Florida, and New York had at least 1.51 times higher adjusted odds of not receiving FCC than children in Vermont. Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic children had 2.11 and 1.58 times higher odds, respectively, of not receiving FCC than non-Hispanic White children. Children from non-English-speaking households had 2.23 and 2.35 times higher adjusted odds of not receiving FCC overall and their doctors not spending enough time in their care than children from English-speaking households, respectively. Children from low-education and low-income households had a higher likelihood of not receiving FCC. The clustering of children who did not receive FCC and its components in several Southern and Western US states, as well as children from poor, uninsured, and publicly insured and of minority background, is a cause for concern in the face of federal policies to reduce health care disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Quintile maps showing state variation in the prevalence of not receiving family-centered care, United States: the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health.
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fig1: Quintile maps showing state variation in the prevalence of not receiving family-centered care, United States: the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health.

Mentions: Table 1 presents the observed prevalence of not receiving FCC and its five components, according to parental report. Nationally, 33.4% of children did not receive FCC. In all, health care providers did not spend enough time with 22.5% of children's families; did not listen carefully to the concerns of 10.6% of families; were not sensitive to the values of 10.8% of families; did not provide information to 14.7% of families; and did not make 12.3% families feel like a partner. The maps in Figure 1 show relatively higher rates of not receiving FCC and its components in a number of Southern and Western states and lower rates in the Midwestern states. In particular, children in Arizona, California, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, Nevada, and Texas had the lowest receipt of FCC and its components. The percentage of children who did not receive FCC ranged from a low of 19.4% in Vermont to a high of 41.0% in Arizona and 42.2% in California. The percentage of children whose health care provider did not spend enough time with them ranged from a low of 9.8% in Vermont to a high of 30% in California and 30.1% in Arizona. Parents reported that health care providers did not listen carefully to the concerns of 14.4%, 14.6%, and 16.5% of children in Mississippi, California, and Nevada, respectively; this percentage was the lowest in Vermont and Massachusetts (5.2%). The percentage of children whose families did not feel like partners in their care were the highest in Arizona (15.8%), Mississippi (15.9%), California (16.7%), and Nevada (17.3%) and the lowest in Vermont (6.9%) and Wisconsin (6.4%).


Geographic, Racial/Ethnic, and Sociodemographic Disparities in Parent-Reported Receipt of Family-Centered Care among US Children.

Azuine RE, Singh GK, Ghandour RM, Kogan MD - Int J Family Med (2015)

Quintile maps showing state variation in the prevalence of not receiving family-centered care, United States: the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697085&req=5

fig1: Quintile maps showing state variation in the prevalence of not receiving family-centered care, United States: the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health.
Mentions: Table 1 presents the observed prevalence of not receiving FCC and its five components, according to parental report. Nationally, 33.4% of children did not receive FCC. In all, health care providers did not spend enough time with 22.5% of children's families; did not listen carefully to the concerns of 10.6% of families; were not sensitive to the values of 10.8% of families; did not provide information to 14.7% of families; and did not make 12.3% families feel like a partner. The maps in Figure 1 show relatively higher rates of not receiving FCC and its components in a number of Southern and Western states and lower rates in the Midwestern states. In particular, children in Arizona, California, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, Nevada, and Texas had the lowest receipt of FCC and its components. The percentage of children who did not receive FCC ranged from a low of 19.4% in Vermont to a high of 41.0% in Arizona and 42.2% in California. The percentage of children whose health care provider did not spend enough time with them ranged from a low of 9.8% in Vermont to a high of 30% in California and 30.1% in Arizona. Parents reported that health care providers did not listen carefully to the concerns of 14.4%, 14.6%, and 16.5% of children in Mississippi, California, and Nevada, respectively; this percentage was the lowest in Vermont and Massachusetts (5.2%). The percentage of children whose families did not feel like partners in their care were the highest in Arizona (15.8%), Mississippi (15.9%), California (16.7%), and Nevada (17.3%) and the lowest in Vermont (6.9%) and Wisconsin (6.4%).

Bottom Line: Based on parent report, 33.4% of US children did not receive FCC.Children from low-education and low-income households had a higher likelihood of not receiving FCC.The clustering of children who did not receive FCC and its components in several Southern and Western US states, as well as children from poor, uninsured, and publicly insured and of minority background, is a cause for concern in the face of federal policies to reduce health care disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10-77, Rockville, MD 20857, USA.

ABSTRACT
This study examined geographic, racial/ethnic, and sociodemographic disparities in parental reporting of receipt of family-centered care (FCC) and its components among US children aged 0-17 years. We used the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health to estimate the prevalence and odds of not receiving FCC by covariates. Based on parent report, 33.4% of US children did not receive FCC. Children in Arizona, Mississippi, Nevada, California, New Jersey, Virginia, Florida, and New York had at least 1.51 times higher adjusted odds of not receiving FCC than children in Vermont. Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic children had 2.11 and 1.58 times higher odds, respectively, of not receiving FCC than non-Hispanic White children. Children from non-English-speaking households had 2.23 and 2.35 times higher adjusted odds of not receiving FCC overall and their doctors not spending enough time in their care than children from English-speaking households, respectively. Children from low-education and low-income households had a higher likelihood of not receiving FCC. The clustering of children who did not receive FCC and its components in several Southern and Western US states, as well as children from poor, uninsured, and publicly insured and of minority background, is a cause for concern in the face of federal policies to reduce health care disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus