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A Case Report on Oral Subcutaneous Dirofilariasis.

Jayasinghe RD, Gunawardane SR, Sitheeque MA, Wickramasinghe S - Case Rep Infect Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: This disease is endemic in South Eastern United States, Australia, Europe, and Central and Southern Asia.Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are the common mosquito borne filarial nematodes that cause infection.Several species of mosquitos including Mansonia uniformis, M. annulifera, and Aedes aegypti are the potential vectors for this disease in Sri Lanka.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

ABSTRACT
Dirofilariasis is an uncommon zoonotic parasitic infection affecting human. The natural hosts for this nematode are animals such as dogs, cats, foxes, jackals, and raccoons. This disease is endemic in South Eastern United States, Australia, Europe, and Central and Southern Asia. Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are the common mosquito borne filarial nematodes that cause infection. Several species of mosquitos including Mansonia uniformis, M. annulifera, and Aedes aegypti are the potential vectors for this disease in Sri Lanka. Two rare cases of dirofilariasis presenting as facial and intraoral lumps are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Surgical site after removing the parasite.
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fig1: Surgical site after removing the parasite.

Mentions: A decision was taken to enucleate the swelling from an intraoral aspect. During the surgery the surface of the nodule was accidentally punctured and a pus-like fluid was found to be oozing from the lesion. It was then decided to open the nodule to drain the remainder of the fluid when a thin ribbon-like object was observed to emerge from the nodule. The remainder of the object was gently evacuated (Figure 1). On becoming apparent the object was a worm it was measured and found to be 7 cm long (Figure 2). It was found to be wriggling for few seconds before it became lifeless. It was immediately sent to the Parasitology Department of the adjoining medical school where it was confirmed to be a male specimen of Dirofilaria repens.


A Case Report on Oral Subcutaneous Dirofilariasis.

Jayasinghe RD, Gunawardane SR, Sitheeque MA, Wickramasinghe S - Case Rep Infect Dis (2015)

Surgical site after removing the parasite.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697078&req=5

fig1: Surgical site after removing the parasite.
Mentions: A decision was taken to enucleate the swelling from an intraoral aspect. During the surgery the surface of the nodule was accidentally punctured and a pus-like fluid was found to be oozing from the lesion. It was then decided to open the nodule to drain the remainder of the fluid when a thin ribbon-like object was observed to emerge from the nodule. The remainder of the object was gently evacuated (Figure 1). On becoming apparent the object was a worm it was measured and found to be 7 cm long (Figure 2). It was found to be wriggling for few seconds before it became lifeless. It was immediately sent to the Parasitology Department of the adjoining medical school where it was confirmed to be a male specimen of Dirofilaria repens.

Bottom Line: This disease is endemic in South Eastern United States, Australia, Europe, and Central and Southern Asia.Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are the common mosquito borne filarial nematodes that cause infection.Several species of mosquitos including Mansonia uniformis, M. annulifera, and Aedes aegypti are the potential vectors for this disease in Sri Lanka.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

ABSTRACT
Dirofilariasis is an uncommon zoonotic parasitic infection affecting human. The natural hosts for this nematode are animals such as dogs, cats, foxes, jackals, and raccoons. This disease is endemic in South Eastern United States, Australia, Europe, and Central and Southern Asia. Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are the common mosquito borne filarial nematodes that cause infection. Several species of mosquitos including Mansonia uniformis, M. annulifera, and Aedes aegypti are the potential vectors for this disease in Sri Lanka. Two rare cases of dirofilariasis presenting as facial and intraoral lumps are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus