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Traumatic Hallux Varus Treated by Minimally Invasive Extensor Hallucis Brevis Tenodesis.

Cheung CN, Lui TH - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: A case of traumatic hallux varus due to avulsion fracture of the lateral side of the base of proximal phalanx was reported.The lateral instability of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was believed to be due to the disruption of adductor hallucis function.It was successfully managed by minimally invasive extensor hallucis brevis tenodesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, North District Hospital, 9 Po Kin Road, Sheung Shui, New Territories, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
A case of traumatic hallux varus due to avulsion fracture of the lateral side of the base of proximal phalanx was reported. The lateral instability of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was believed to be due to the disruption of adductor hallucis function. It was successfully managed by minimally invasive extensor hallucis brevis tenodesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Postoperatively, the passive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion range of motion of the first MTPJ was satisfactory.
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fig4: Postoperatively, the passive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion range of motion of the first MTPJ was satisfactory.

Mentions: Postoperatively, the patient was advised on nonweight bearing walking. The K wire was removed and the patient was allowed weight bearing walking with wooden base sandal 4 weeks after the operation. She can resume normal shoe gear 2 months after the operation. There was no complication noted. Upon the latest follow-up 31 months after the operation, there was no more great toe pain and the hallux varus deformity was corrected (Figure 3). The lateral stability of the 1st MTPJ was restored (Video 2) and dorsiflexion-plantar flexion motion of the great toe was satisfactory (Figure 4).


Traumatic Hallux Varus Treated by Minimally Invasive Extensor Hallucis Brevis Tenodesis.

Cheung CN, Lui TH - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Postoperatively, the passive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion range of motion of the first MTPJ was satisfactory.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697074&req=5

fig4: Postoperatively, the passive dorsiflexion and plantar flexion range of motion of the first MTPJ was satisfactory.
Mentions: Postoperatively, the patient was advised on nonweight bearing walking. The K wire was removed and the patient was allowed weight bearing walking with wooden base sandal 4 weeks after the operation. She can resume normal shoe gear 2 months after the operation. There was no complication noted. Upon the latest follow-up 31 months after the operation, there was no more great toe pain and the hallux varus deformity was corrected (Figure 3). The lateral stability of the 1st MTPJ was restored (Video 2) and dorsiflexion-plantar flexion motion of the great toe was satisfactory (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: A case of traumatic hallux varus due to avulsion fracture of the lateral side of the base of proximal phalanx was reported.The lateral instability of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was believed to be due to the disruption of adductor hallucis function.It was successfully managed by minimally invasive extensor hallucis brevis tenodesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, North District Hospital, 9 Po Kin Road, Sheung Shui, New Territories, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
A case of traumatic hallux varus due to avulsion fracture of the lateral side of the base of proximal phalanx was reported. The lateral instability of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was believed to be due to the disruption of adductor hallucis function. It was successfully managed by minimally invasive extensor hallucis brevis tenodesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus