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The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Srinivasan SM, Kaur M, Park IK, Gifford TD, Marsh KL, Bhat AN - Autism Res Treat (2015)

Bottom Line: Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2.All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis.The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Biomechanics and Movement Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA.

ABSTRACT
We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Training-related changes in interpersonal synchrony in the rhythm and robot groups. Error bars represent standard errors. ∗p < 0.05.
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fig5: Training-related changes in interpersonal synchrony in the rhythm and robot groups. Error bars represent standard errors. ∗p < 0.05.

Mentions: The repeated measures ANOVA in the rhythm group revealed main effects of session (F(1,35) = 4.57, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12) and synchrony type (F(1.263,44.21) = 51.98, p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.60) as well as a significant session x synchrony type interaction (F(2,70) = 3.99, p = 0.023, ηp2 = 0.10). Post hoc analysis of the session x synchrony type interaction showed that the rhythm group increased amount of time spent in-synchrony with the adult from the early to the late session (Early: M  (SD) = 45.59  (29.45), Late: M  (SD) = 52.91  (30.57), p = 0.02, SMD = 0.23) (see Figure 5). Individual data show that 10 out of the 12 children followed the group trends.


The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Srinivasan SM, Kaur M, Park IK, Gifford TD, Marsh KL, Bhat AN - Autism Res Treat (2015)

Training-related changes in interpersonal synchrony in the rhythm and robot groups. Error bars represent standard errors. ∗p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697072&req=5

fig5: Training-related changes in interpersonal synchrony in the rhythm and robot groups. Error bars represent standard errors. ∗p < 0.05.
Mentions: The repeated measures ANOVA in the rhythm group revealed main effects of session (F(1,35) = 4.57, p = 0.04, ηp2 = 0.12) and synchrony type (F(1.263,44.21) = 51.98, p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.60) as well as a significant session x synchrony type interaction (F(2,70) = 3.99, p = 0.023, ηp2 = 0.10). Post hoc analysis of the session x synchrony type interaction showed that the rhythm group increased amount of time spent in-synchrony with the adult from the early to the late session (Early: M  (SD) = 45.59  (29.45), Late: M  (SD) = 52.91  (30.57), p = 0.02, SMD = 0.23) (see Figure 5). Individual data show that 10 out of the 12 children followed the group trends.

Bottom Line: Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2.All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis.The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Biomechanics and Movement Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA.

ABSTRACT
We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus