Limits...
The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Srinivasan SM, Kaur M, Park IK, Gifford TD, Marsh KL, Bhat AN - Autism Res Treat (2015)

Bottom Line: Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2.All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis.The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Biomechanics and Movement Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA.

ABSTRACT
We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Experimental set-up for a rhythm group training session. (b) Experimental set-up for a robot group training session. (c) Experimental set-up for a comparison group training session.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697072&req=5

fig2: (a) Experimental set-up for a rhythm group training session. (b) Experimental set-up for a robot group training session. (c) Experimental set-up for a comparison group training session.

Mentions: In all three groups, children engaged in training activities within a triadic context involving the child, an expert trainer, and an adult model (see Figures 2(a), 2(b), and 2(c)). The expert trainer was the instructor and guided the child through the activities of the session. In the robot group, the robot was the instructor and the human trainer controlled the robot using a laptop. The adult model served as a buddy and a visual model for the child and provided hand-on-hand assistance, if needed, during the session. The rhythm and robot groups engaged in socially embedded whole-body movement games (see Figures 2(a) and 2(b)), whereas the comparison group engaged in tabletop activities promoting fine motor, social communication, and academic skills within a group setting (see Figure 2(c)). The comparison group was structured to mimic the types of activities that children with autism typically receive in special education settings. In all three groups, we promoted social communication skills such as eye contact, turn taking, greeting/farewell, responding to questions, commenting, asking for help, and use of gestures. In addition, the rhythm and robot groups promoted gross motor skills including balance, bilateral coordination, imitation, interpersonal synchrony, and manual dexterity during joint action games, whereas the comparison group promoted fine motor skills such as symmetrical and asymmetrical grips and pinches, coloring, drawing, cutting, and gluing. All training sessions were videotaped for further behavioral coding.


The Effects of Rhythm and Robotic Interventions on the Imitation/Praxis, Interpersonal Synchrony, and Motor Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Srinivasan SM, Kaur M, Park IK, Gifford TD, Marsh KL, Bhat AN - Autism Res Treat (2015)

(a) Experimental set-up for a rhythm group training session. (b) Experimental set-up for a robot group training session. (c) Experimental set-up for a comparison group training session.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697072&req=5

fig2: (a) Experimental set-up for a rhythm group training session. (b) Experimental set-up for a robot group training session. (c) Experimental set-up for a comparison group training session.
Mentions: In all three groups, children engaged in training activities within a triadic context involving the child, an expert trainer, and an adult model (see Figures 2(a), 2(b), and 2(c)). The expert trainer was the instructor and guided the child through the activities of the session. In the robot group, the robot was the instructor and the human trainer controlled the robot using a laptop. The adult model served as a buddy and a visual model for the child and provided hand-on-hand assistance, if needed, during the session. The rhythm and robot groups engaged in socially embedded whole-body movement games (see Figures 2(a) and 2(b)), whereas the comparison group engaged in tabletop activities promoting fine motor, social communication, and academic skills within a group setting (see Figure 2(c)). The comparison group was structured to mimic the types of activities that children with autism typically receive in special education settings. In all three groups, we promoted social communication skills such as eye contact, turn taking, greeting/farewell, responding to questions, commenting, asking for help, and use of gestures. In addition, the rhythm and robot groups promoted gross motor skills including balance, bilateral coordination, imitation, interpersonal synchrony, and manual dexterity during joint action games, whereas the comparison group promoted fine motor skills such as symmetrical and asymmetrical grips and pinches, coloring, drawing, cutting, and gluing. All training sessions were videotaped for further behavioral coding.

Bottom Line: Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2.All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis.The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Biomechanics and Movement Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19713, USA.

ABSTRACT
We assessed the effects of three interventions, rhythm, robotic, and standard-of-care, on the imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and overall motor performance of 36 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between 5 and 12 years of age. Children were matched on age, level of functioning, and services received, prior to random assignment to one of the three groups. Training was provided for 8 weeks with 4 sessions provided each week. We assessed generalized changes in motor skills from the pretest to the posttest using a standardized test of motor performance, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2). We also assessed training-specific changes in imitation/praxis and interpersonal synchrony during an early and a late session. Consistent with the training activities practiced, the rhythm and robot groups improved on the body coordination composite of the BOT-2, whereas the comparison group improved on the fine manual control composite of the BOT-2. All three groups demonstrated improvements in imitation/praxis. The rhythm and robot groups also showed improved interpersonal synchrony performance from the early to the late session. Overall, socially embedded movement-based contexts are valuable in promoting imitation/praxis, interpersonal synchrony, and motor performance and should be included within the standard-of-care treatment for children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus