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Evaluation and management of male lower urinary tract symptoms: treatment patterns and guidelines in a correlation study among Polish urology consultants.

Borkowski T, Golabek T, Chlosta PL, Borkowski A - Arch Med Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Analysis of the association of availability and acceptance of the EAU guidelines with question answers showed no pattern.A multivariate regression model showed a positive correlation with regards to correct answers given in the survey and doctors' participation in international congresses (p = 0.018, r = 0.181).The data obtained provide valuable benchmarks and also identify possible interventions that may improve the standard of care in this population of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General, Oncological and Functional Urology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2013, the European Association of Urology (EAU) released a new edition of the guidelines on management of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including benign prostatic obstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate how well the EAU guidelines have been implemented in day-to-day practice by Polish urologists.

Material and methods: A structured questionnaire, which explored how urologists diagnose and manage male lower urinary tract symptoms, was emailed to all certified, actively practicing urologists from a list provided by the Polish Urological Association.

Results: The questionnaire return rate was 33.7% (135/400). Overall, the median (quartile 1; quartile 3) frequency of correct answers was 65.0% (58.0%; 69.0%). Analysis of the association of availability and acceptance of the EAU guidelines with question answers showed no pattern. A multivariate regression model showed a positive correlation with regards to correct answers given in the survey and doctors' participation in international congresses (p = 0.018, r = 0.181). Basket analysis showed the strongest association for those who failed to correctly answer the questions regarding diagnosis of LUTS and overactive bladder (OAB) (support = 27.41%, confidence = 86.05%).

Conclusions: Although there is a significant degree of adherence to the 2013 EAU guidelines, some discrepancies between urologists' practice and the recommendations regarding diagnosis and treatment of male LUTS do exist. The data obtained provide valuable benchmarks and also identify possible interventions that may improve the standard of care in this population of patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 ccLUTS – Lower urinary symptoms, cc – cubic centimeters, 5ARI – 5α-reductase inhibitors, MRA – muscarinic receptor antagonists.
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Figure 0003: The preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 ccLUTS – Lower urinary symptoms, cc – cubic centimeters, 5ARI – 5α-reductase inhibitors, MRA – muscarinic receptor antagonists.

Mentions: Almost all urologists (84.4%) chose α-blockers as the first line treatment option in men with LUTS and a prostate size < 40 cc, whereas others prescribed 5ARI monotherapy, α-blockers with 5ARIs, phytotherapy, or muscarinic receptor antagonists (Figure 2). α-Blockers were the preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 cc, as per the opinion of 48.9% of respondents, whereas 17.1% chose 5ARI monotherapy, and 29.6% prescribed alpha blockers with 5ARIs as the primary management (Figure 3).


Evaluation and management of male lower urinary tract symptoms: treatment patterns and guidelines in a correlation study among Polish urology consultants.

Borkowski T, Golabek T, Chlosta PL, Borkowski A - Arch Med Sci (2015)

The preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 ccLUTS – Lower urinary symptoms, cc – cubic centimeters, 5ARI – 5α-reductase inhibitors, MRA – muscarinic receptor antagonists.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697063&req=5

Figure 0003: The preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 ccLUTS – Lower urinary symptoms, cc – cubic centimeters, 5ARI – 5α-reductase inhibitors, MRA – muscarinic receptor antagonists.
Mentions: Almost all urologists (84.4%) chose α-blockers as the first line treatment option in men with LUTS and a prostate size < 40 cc, whereas others prescribed 5ARI monotherapy, α-blockers with 5ARIs, phytotherapy, or muscarinic receptor antagonists (Figure 2). α-Blockers were the preferred first line treatment option in men with LUTS and prostate size > 40 cc, as per the opinion of 48.9% of respondents, whereas 17.1% chose 5ARI monotherapy, and 29.6% prescribed alpha blockers with 5ARIs as the primary management (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Analysis of the association of availability and acceptance of the EAU guidelines with question answers showed no pattern.A multivariate regression model showed a positive correlation with regards to correct answers given in the survey and doctors' participation in international congresses (p = 0.018, r = 0.181).The data obtained provide valuable benchmarks and also identify possible interventions that may improve the standard of care in this population of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General, Oncological and Functional Urology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2013, the European Association of Urology (EAU) released a new edition of the guidelines on management of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including benign prostatic obstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate how well the EAU guidelines have been implemented in day-to-day practice by Polish urologists.

Material and methods: A structured questionnaire, which explored how urologists diagnose and manage male lower urinary tract symptoms, was emailed to all certified, actively practicing urologists from a list provided by the Polish Urological Association.

Results: The questionnaire return rate was 33.7% (135/400). Overall, the median (quartile 1; quartile 3) frequency of correct answers was 65.0% (58.0%; 69.0%). Analysis of the association of availability and acceptance of the EAU guidelines with question answers showed no pattern. A multivariate regression model showed a positive correlation with regards to correct answers given in the survey and doctors' participation in international congresses (p = 0.018, r = 0.181). Basket analysis showed the strongest association for those who failed to correctly answer the questions regarding diagnosis of LUTS and overactive bladder (OAB) (support = 27.41%, confidence = 86.05%).

Conclusions: Although there is a significant degree of adherence to the 2013 EAU guidelines, some discrepancies between urologists' practice and the recommendations regarding diagnosis and treatment of male LUTS do exist. The data obtained provide valuable benchmarks and also identify possible interventions that may improve the standard of care in this population of patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus