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Antiobesity, hypolipidemic, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of Achyranthes aspera seed saponins in high cholesterol fed albino rats.

Khan N, Akhtar MS, Khan BA, Braga Vde A, Reich A - Arch Med Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: To determine the mechanism underlying the observed effects, serum antioxidant status was assessed according to ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), superoxide dismutase and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays in saponin-treated hyperlipidemic animals.No significant hepatotoxicity was produced by such treatment as the serum liver enzyme activity remained unaltered.However, its exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Numerous herbal medicines have been recommended for the treatment of different diseases. Achyranthes aspera, Linn. (Family: Amaranthaceae), popularly known as Charchitta or Pitpapra, is commonly used by traditional healers for the treatment of fever, malaria, dysentery, asthma, arterial hypertension, pneumonia, and diabetes. The root extract is well reputed for its insect molting hormonal activity. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of saponins from Achyranthes aspera seeds on the serum lipid profile of albino rats fed a high cholesterol diet.

Material and methods: Hypolipidemic, antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of these saponins were tested as described previously. To determine the mechanism underlying the observed effects, serum antioxidant status was assessed according to ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), superoxide dismutase and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays in saponin-treated hyperlipidemic animals. Liver enzyme levels were determined to reveal any possible hepatotoxicity.

Results: Four-week oral administration of A. aspera seed saponins produced a significant (p < 0.05) decrease of total cholesterol, total triglycerides and LDL-C and a significant increase of HDL-C level in hyperlipidemic rats. Treatment with A. aspera seed saponins also showed a significant (p < 0.01) improvement of serum antioxidant status in tested animals. No significant hepatotoxicity was produced by such treatment as the serum liver enzyme activity remained unaltered.

Conclusions: Saponins from A. aspera seeds possess antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant properties which might lead to improvement of serum lipid profile and blood antioxidant status. Our findings support the folkloric use of this indigenous plant in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. However, its exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean blood serum antioxidant profile (means ± SEM, n = 6) on the 28th day after oral administration of 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 mg of A. aspera seed saponins with high cholesterol diet (HCD) in comparison to normally, HCD and HCD + atorvastatin treated control rats (#p < 0.05, when compared with normal control receiving only normal diet with vehicle (2% gum tragacanth solution), *p < 0.05 when compared with the control receiving only high cholesterol diet with 2% gum tragacanth solution)
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Figure 0002: Mean blood serum antioxidant profile (means ± SEM, n = 6) on the 28th day after oral administration of 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 mg of A. aspera seed saponins with high cholesterol diet (HCD) in comparison to normally, HCD and HCD + atorvastatin treated control rats (#p < 0.05, when compared with normal control receiving only normal diet with vehicle (2% gum tragacanth solution), *p < 0.05 when compared with the control receiving only high cholesterol diet with 2% gum tragacanth solution)

Mentions: Antioxidant activity of saponins of A. aspera seeds was judged by ABTS, FRAP and SOD assays. Administration of saponins of A. aspera seeds in different doses effectively acted as free radical scavengers, and demonstrated significant (p < 0.01) antioxidant activity (Figure 2). Administration of A. aspera seed saponins along with a high cholesterol diet caused a significant, dose-dependent improvement of the serum antioxidant status of treated rats. The FRAP content was reduced, whereas SOD and ABTS contents were significantly improved (Figure 2).


Antiobesity, hypolipidemic, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of Achyranthes aspera seed saponins in high cholesterol fed albino rats.

Khan N, Akhtar MS, Khan BA, Braga Vde A, Reich A - Arch Med Sci (2015)

Mean blood serum antioxidant profile (means ± SEM, n = 6) on the 28th day after oral administration of 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 mg of A. aspera seed saponins with high cholesterol diet (HCD) in comparison to normally, HCD and HCD + atorvastatin treated control rats (#p < 0.05, when compared with normal control receiving only normal diet with vehicle (2% gum tragacanth solution), *p < 0.05 when compared with the control receiving only high cholesterol diet with 2% gum tragacanth solution)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697059&req=5

Figure 0002: Mean blood serum antioxidant profile (means ± SEM, n = 6) on the 28th day after oral administration of 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 mg of A. aspera seed saponins with high cholesterol diet (HCD) in comparison to normally, HCD and HCD + atorvastatin treated control rats (#p < 0.05, when compared with normal control receiving only normal diet with vehicle (2% gum tragacanth solution), *p < 0.05 when compared with the control receiving only high cholesterol diet with 2% gum tragacanth solution)
Mentions: Antioxidant activity of saponins of A. aspera seeds was judged by ABTS, FRAP and SOD assays. Administration of saponins of A. aspera seeds in different doses effectively acted as free radical scavengers, and demonstrated significant (p < 0.01) antioxidant activity (Figure 2). Administration of A. aspera seed saponins along with a high cholesterol diet caused a significant, dose-dependent improvement of the serum antioxidant status of treated rats. The FRAP content was reduced, whereas SOD and ABTS contents were significantly improved (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: To determine the mechanism underlying the observed effects, serum antioxidant status was assessed according to ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), superoxide dismutase and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays in saponin-treated hyperlipidemic animals.No significant hepatotoxicity was produced by such treatment as the serum liver enzyme activity remained unaltered.However, its exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Numerous herbal medicines have been recommended for the treatment of different diseases. Achyranthes aspera, Linn. (Family: Amaranthaceae), popularly known as Charchitta or Pitpapra, is commonly used by traditional healers for the treatment of fever, malaria, dysentery, asthma, arterial hypertension, pneumonia, and diabetes. The root extract is well reputed for its insect molting hormonal activity. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of saponins from Achyranthes aspera seeds on the serum lipid profile of albino rats fed a high cholesterol diet.

Material and methods: Hypolipidemic, antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of these saponins were tested as described previously. To determine the mechanism underlying the observed effects, serum antioxidant status was assessed according to ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), superoxide dismutase and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays in saponin-treated hyperlipidemic animals. Liver enzyme levels were determined to reveal any possible hepatotoxicity.

Results: Four-week oral administration of A. aspera seed saponins produced a significant (p < 0.05) decrease of total cholesterol, total triglycerides and LDL-C and a significant increase of HDL-C level in hyperlipidemic rats. Treatment with A. aspera seed saponins also showed a significant (p < 0.01) improvement of serum antioxidant status in tested animals. No significant hepatotoxicity was produced by such treatment as the serum liver enzyme activity remained unaltered.

Conclusions: Saponins from A. aspera seeds possess antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant properties which might lead to improvement of serum lipid profile and blood antioxidant status. Our findings support the folkloric use of this indigenous plant in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. However, its exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus