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Radiolucent rim as a possible diagnostic aid for differentiating jaw lesions.

Mortazavi H, Baharvand M, Rahmani S, Jafari S, Parvaei P - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: We used general search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks to find relevant studies by using keywords such as "jaw disease," "jaw lesions," "radiolucent rim," "radiolucent border," and "radiolucent halo." More than 200 articles were found, of which 70 were broadly relevant to the topic.We ultimately included 50 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest.We propose a novel subcategory, jaw lesions with a radiolucent rim, which includes eight entities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we formulate a new proposal that complements previous classifications in order to assist dental practitioners in performing a differential diagnosis based on patients' radiographs. We used general search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks to find relevant studies by using keywords such as "jaw disease," "jaw lesions," "radiolucent rim," "radiolucent border," and "radiolucent halo." More than 200 articles were found, of which 70 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 50 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following eight lesions were identified as having a radiolucent rim: periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, florid cemento-osseous dysplasia, cemento-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. We propose a novel subcategory, jaw lesions with a radiolucent rim, which includes eight entities. The implementation of this new category can help improve the diagnoses that dental practitioners make based on patients' radiographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is seen at the periapex of the left mandibular first molar with a radiolucent rim (arrow) on a panoramic radiograph.
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Figure 2: Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is seen at the periapex of the left mandibular first molar with a radiolucent rim (arrow) on a panoramic radiograph.

Mentions: Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia was first described by Summerlin and Tomich15 based on the location of the involved bone (tooth-bearing areas of the posterior jaws and extraction sites). Although the etiology is unknown, some triggering factors such as trauma, caries, periodontal disease, infection, and systemic diseases have been identified. The periodontal ligament has been suggested as a probable origin for focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Zegarelli et al.13 suggested that hormonal imbalance may also be a causative factor. It causes no symptoms and is detected only on radiographic examination. The majority of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia lesions occur in the mandible. Almost one third of patients with focal cementoosseous dysplasia present with local jaw expansion and mild discomfort.16 This entity has three stages of maturation: early (a well-defined radiolucency at the apices of the mandibular teeth), intermediate (a radiolucent-opaque lesion with a well-defined radiolucent halo) and late (a radiopaque lesion, often with an ill-defined periphery).17 Rao et al.18 described focal cemento-osseous dysplasia as a small well-defined radiopacity surrounded by a uniform radiolucent halo (Fig. 2).


Radiolucent rim as a possible diagnostic aid for differentiating jaw lesions.

Mortazavi H, Baharvand M, Rahmani S, Jafari S, Parvaei P - Imaging Sci Dent (2015)

Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is seen at the periapex of the left mandibular first molar with a radiolucent rim (arrow) on a panoramic radiograph.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4697011&req=5

Figure 2: Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is seen at the periapex of the left mandibular first molar with a radiolucent rim (arrow) on a panoramic radiograph.
Mentions: Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia was first described by Summerlin and Tomich15 based on the location of the involved bone (tooth-bearing areas of the posterior jaws and extraction sites). Although the etiology is unknown, some triggering factors such as trauma, caries, periodontal disease, infection, and systemic diseases have been identified. The periodontal ligament has been suggested as a probable origin for focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Zegarelli et al.13 suggested that hormonal imbalance may also be a causative factor. It causes no symptoms and is detected only on radiographic examination. The majority of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia lesions occur in the mandible. Almost one third of patients with focal cementoosseous dysplasia present with local jaw expansion and mild discomfort.16 This entity has three stages of maturation: early (a well-defined radiolucency at the apices of the mandibular teeth), intermediate (a radiolucent-opaque lesion with a well-defined radiolucent halo) and late (a radiopaque lesion, often with an ill-defined periphery).17 Rao et al.18 described focal cemento-osseous dysplasia as a small well-defined radiopacity surrounded by a uniform radiolucent halo (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: We used general search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks to find relevant studies by using keywords such as "jaw disease," "jaw lesions," "radiolucent rim," "radiolucent border," and "radiolucent halo." More than 200 articles were found, of which 70 were broadly relevant to the topic.We ultimately included 50 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest.We propose a novel subcategory, jaw lesions with a radiolucent rim, which includes eight entities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we formulate a new proposal that complements previous classifications in order to assist dental practitioners in performing a differential diagnosis based on patients' radiographs. We used general search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks to find relevant studies by using keywords such as "jaw disease," "jaw lesions," "radiolucent rim," "radiolucent border," and "radiolucent halo." More than 200 articles were found, of which 70 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 50 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following eight lesions were identified as having a radiolucent rim: periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, florid cemento-osseous dysplasia, cemento-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. We propose a novel subcategory, jaw lesions with a radiolucent rim, which includes eight entities. The implementation of this new category can help improve the diagnoses that dental practitioners make based on patients' radiographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus