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Effects of Floral Scent, Color and Pollen on Foraging Decisions and Oocyte Development of Common Green Bottle Flies.

Brodie BS, Smith MA, Lawrence J, Gries G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We also tested the effect of a floral pollen diet with 0-35% moisture content on the ability of females to mature their oocytes.With evidence that L. sericata exploits floral cues during foraging, and that pollen can be an alternate protein source to animal feces and carrion, Pollen apparently plays a major role in the foraging ecology of L. sericata and possibly other filth flies.These flies, in turn, may play a significant role as pollinators, as supported by a recently published study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Simon Fraser University, Department of Biological Sciences, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Meigen) and other filth flies frequently visit pollen-rich composite flowers such as the Oxeye daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare Lam. In laboratory experiments with L. sericata, we investigated the effect of generic floral scent and color cues, and of Oxeye daisy-specific cues, on foraging decisions by recently eclosed flies. We also tested the effect of a floral pollen diet with 0-35% moisture content on the ability of females to mature their oocytes. Our data indicate that (1) young flies in the presence of generic floral scent respond more strongly to a uniformly yellow cue than to any other uniform color cue (green, white, black, blue, red) except for ultraviolet (UV); (2) the floral scent of Oxeye daisies enhances the attractiveness of a yellow cue; and (3) moisture-rich pollen provides nutrients that facilitate ovary maturation of flies. With evidence that L. sericata exploits floral cues during foraging, and that pollen can be an alternate protein source to animal feces and carrion, Pollen apparently plays a major role in the foraging ecology of L. sericata and possibly other filth flies. These flies, in turn, may play a significant role as pollinators, as supported by a recently published study.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of color cues on attraction of Lucilia sericata.Mean proportions of 1-, 2-, and 3-day-old males and females captured in experiments 1–6 (n = 15 each; Fig 1) in inverted bottle traps (Fig 2A) that were baited with a generic floral scent (honey) and with a specific color cue (Fig 2D) covering the inner surface of the trap funnel. In each experiment, the number in parenthesis indicates the total number of flies captured, and an asterisk (*) on a bar indicates a significant preference for the test stimulus (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 0.05).
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pone.0145055.g003: Effect of color cues on attraction of Lucilia sericata.Mean proportions of 1-, 2-, and 3-day-old males and females captured in experiments 1–6 (n = 15 each; Fig 1) in inverted bottle traps (Fig 2A) that were baited with a generic floral scent (honey) and with a specific color cue (Fig 2D) covering the inner surface of the trap funnel. In each experiment, the number in parenthesis indicates the total number of flies captured, and an asterisk (*) on a bar indicates a significant preference for the test stimulus (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 0.05).

Mentions: Yellow had a significant effect on captures of flies (Fig 3; exps. 1–5). Traps with a yellow top captured significantly more flies than traps with a red top (Z = 4.65, df = 1, p = < 0.0001), blue top (Z = 4.65, df = 1, p < 0.0001), green top (Z = 4.06, df = 1, p < 0.0001), white top (Z = 3.45, df = 1, p = 0.0006) or black top (Z = 4.48, df = 1, p < 0.0001). In contrast, traps with a yellow top were not significantly more effective in capturing flies than traps with a UV light-reflecting top (Exp. 6: Z = 0.00, df = 1, p = 1).


Effects of Floral Scent, Color and Pollen on Foraging Decisions and Oocyte Development of Common Green Bottle Flies.

Brodie BS, Smith MA, Lawrence J, Gries G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effect of color cues on attraction of Lucilia sericata.Mean proportions of 1-, 2-, and 3-day-old males and females captured in experiments 1–6 (n = 15 each; Fig 1) in inverted bottle traps (Fig 2A) that were baited with a generic floral scent (honey) and with a specific color cue (Fig 2D) covering the inner surface of the trap funnel. In each experiment, the number in parenthesis indicates the total number of flies captured, and an asterisk (*) on a bar indicates a significant preference for the test stimulus (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696748&req=5

pone.0145055.g003: Effect of color cues on attraction of Lucilia sericata.Mean proportions of 1-, 2-, and 3-day-old males and females captured in experiments 1–6 (n = 15 each; Fig 1) in inverted bottle traps (Fig 2A) that were baited with a generic floral scent (honey) and with a specific color cue (Fig 2D) covering the inner surface of the trap funnel. In each experiment, the number in parenthesis indicates the total number of flies captured, and an asterisk (*) on a bar indicates a significant preference for the test stimulus (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 0.05).
Mentions: Yellow had a significant effect on captures of flies (Fig 3; exps. 1–5). Traps with a yellow top captured significantly more flies than traps with a red top (Z = 4.65, df = 1, p = < 0.0001), blue top (Z = 4.65, df = 1, p < 0.0001), green top (Z = 4.06, df = 1, p < 0.0001), white top (Z = 3.45, df = 1, p = 0.0006) or black top (Z = 4.48, df = 1, p < 0.0001). In contrast, traps with a yellow top were not significantly more effective in capturing flies than traps with a UV light-reflecting top (Exp. 6: Z = 0.00, df = 1, p = 1).

Bottom Line: We also tested the effect of a floral pollen diet with 0-35% moisture content on the ability of females to mature their oocytes.With evidence that L. sericata exploits floral cues during foraging, and that pollen can be an alternate protein source to animal feces and carrion, Pollen apparently plays a major role in the foraging ecology of L. sericata and possibly other filth flies.These flies, in turn, may play a significant role as pollinators, as supported by a recently published study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Simon Fraser University, Department of Biological Sciences, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Meigen) and other filth flies frequently visit pollen-rich composite flowers such as the Oxeye daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare Lam. In laboratory experiments with L. sericata, we investigated the effect of generic floral scent and color cues, and of Oxeye daisy-specific cues, on foraging decisions by recently eclosed flies. We also tested the effect of a floral pollen diet with 0-35% moisture content on the ability of females to mature their oocytes. Our data indicate that (1) young flies in the presence of generic floral scent respond more strongly to a uniformly yellow cue than to any other uniform color cue (green, white, black, blue, red) except for ultraviolet (UV); (2) the floral scent of Oxeye daisies enhances the attractiveness of a yellow cue; and (3) moisture-rich pollen provides nutrients that facilitate ovary maturation of flies. With evidence that L. sericata exploits floral cues during foraging, and that pollen can be an alternate protein source to animal feces and carrion, Pollen apparently plays a major role in the foraging ecology of L. sericata and possibly other filth flies. These flies, in turn, may play a significant role as pollinators, as supported by a recently published study.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus