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Nonverbal Synchrony in Social Interactions of Patients with Schizophrenia Indicates Socio-Communicative Deficits.

Kupper Z, Ramseyer F, Hoffmann H, Tschacher W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients' movement.When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants' movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent.Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners' imitation of their movements was reduced.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Translational Research Center, University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disordered interpersonal communication can be a serious problem in schizophrenia. Recent advances in computer-based measures allow reliable and objective quantification of nonverbal behavior. Research using these novel measures has shown that objective amounts of body and head movement in patients with schizophrenia during social interactions are closely related to the symptom profiles of these patients. In addition to and above mere amounts of movement, the degree of synchrony, or imitation, between patients and normal interactants may be indicative of core deficits underlying various problems in domains related to interpersonal communication, such as symptoms, social competence, and social functioning.

Methods: Nonverbal synchrony was assessed objectively using Motion Energy Analysis (MEA) in 378 brief, videotaped role-play scenes involving 27 stabilized outpatients diagnosed with paranoid-type schizophrenia.

Results: Low nonverbal synchrony was indicative of symptoms, low social competence, impaired social functioning, and low self-evaluation of competence. These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients' movement. When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants' movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent. Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners' imitation of their movements was reduced.

Conclusions: Nonverbal synchrony can be an objective and sensitive indicator of the severity of patients' problems. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nonverbal synchrony may provide novel insights into specific relationships between symptoms, cognition, and core communicative problems in schizophrenia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Video-based quantification of nonverbal behavior with motion energy analysis (MEA)—Regions of interest (A) and motion energy time series (B).
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pone.0145882.g001: Video-based quantification of nonverbal behavior with motion energy analysis (MEA)—Regions of interest (A) and motion energy time series (B).

Mentions: Role-play scenes were recorded in VHS format using a fixed camera. Individual role-play scenes had a median duration of 52 seconds. A total of 378 movie sequences resulted from recordings of 27 patients in 14 scenes of the RPT. Digital conversion of VHS tapes was conducted at 15 frames per second with an analogue-to-digital converter. MEA [41,42] is based on a frame-differencing algorithm, which quantifies the amount of change from one movie frame to the next. Given the fixed camera position and lack of movement within the range of the camera, there is no difference between consecutive frames. However, when a person or an object moves, motion energy may be defined as the amount of change observed from one frame to the next. This kind of objective quantification may be performed on the entire image or on selected parts thereof. Predefined regions of interest (ROI), for example, a region including a seated person's head, may be chosen freely. For the assessment of patient movement in role-play scenes, two ROIs were defined. They pertained to the patient's head (without the neck) and the upper body (from the base of the chair up to the shoulders), as seen in Fig 1.


Nonverbal Synchrony in Social Interactions of Patients with Schizophrenia Indicates Socio-Communicative Deficits.

Kupper Z, Ramseyer F, Hoffmann H, Tschacher W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Video-based quantification of nonverbal behavior with motion energy analysis (MEA)—Regions of interest (A) and motion energy time series (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696745&req=5

pone.0145882.g001: Video-based quantification of nonverbal behavior with motion energy analysis (MEA)—Regions of interest (A) and motion energy time series (B).
Mentions: Role-play scenes were recorded in VHS format using a fixed camera. Individual role-play scenes had a median duration of 52 seconds. A total of 378 movie sequences resulted from recordings of 27 patients in 14 scenes of the RPT. Digital conversion of VHS tapes was conducted at 15 frames per second with an analogue-to-digital converter. MEA [41,42] is based on a frame-differencing algorithm, which quantifies the amount of change from one movie frame to the next. Given the fixed camera position and lack of movement within the range of the camera, there is no difference between consecutive frames. However, when a person or an object moves, motion energy may be defined as the amount of change observed from one frame to the next. This kind of objective quantification may be performed on the entire image or on selected parts thereof. Predefined regions of interest (ROI), for example, a region including a seated person's head, may be chosen freely. For the assessment of patient movement in role-play scenes, two ROIs were defined. They pertained to the patient's head (without the neck) and the upper body (from the base of the chair up to the shoulders), as seen in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients' movement.When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants' movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent.Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners' imitation of their movements was reduced.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Translational Research Center, University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disordered interpersonal communication can be a serious problem in schizophrenia. Recent advances in computer-based measures allow reliable and objective quantification of nonverbal behavior. Research using these novel measures has shown that objective amounts of body and head movement in patients with schizophrenia during social interactions are closely related to the symptom profiles of these patients. In addition to and above mere amounts of movement, the degree of synchrony, or imitation, between patients and normal interactants may be indicative of core deficits underlying various problems in domains related to interpersonal communication, such as symptoms, social competence, and social functioning.

Methods: Nonverbal synchrony was assessed objectively using Motion Energy Analysis (MEA) in 378 brief, videotaped role-play scenes involving 27 stabilized outpatients diagnosed with paranoid-type schizophrenia.

Results: Low nonverbal synchrony was indicative of symptoms, low social competence, impaired social functioning, and low self-evaluation of competence. These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients' movement. When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants' movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent. Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners' imitation of their movements was reduced.

Conclusions: Nonverbal synchrony can be an objective and sensitive indicator of the severity of patients' problems. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nonverbal synchrony may provide novel insights into specific relationships between symptoms, cognition, and core communicative problems in schizophrenia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus