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Judged and Remembered Trustworthiness of Faces Is Enhanced by Experiencing Multisensory Synchrony and Asynchrony in the Right Order.

Toscano H, Schubert TW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This work builds on the enfacement effect.This typically leads to cognitive and social-cognitive effects similar to self-other merging.The results of both studies show that order of stroking creates a context in which multisensory synchrony can affect the trustworthiness of faces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Centro de Investigação e Intervenção Social, Lisboa, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This work builds on the enfacement effect. This effect occurs when experiencing a rhythmic stimulation on one's cheek while seeing someone else's face being touched in a synchronous way. This typically leads to cognitive and social-cognitive effects similar to self-other merging. In two studies, we demonstrate that this multisensory stimulation can change the evaluation of the other's face. In the first study, participants judged the stranger's face and similar faces as being more trustworthy after synchrony, but not after asynchrony. Synchrony interacted with the order of the stroking; hence trustworthiness only changed when the synchronous stimulation occurred before the asynchronous one. In the second study, a synchronous stimulation caused participants to remember the stranger's face as more trustworthy, but again only when the synchronous stimulation came before the asynchronous one. The results of both studies show that order of stroking creates a context in which multisensory synchrony can affect the trustworthiness of faces.

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Means and differences with 95% Confidence Intervals of trustworthiness judgments according to type of stroking (synchrony vs asynchrony), order (Synchrony first vs Asynchrony first) and Morphing (100% vs 35% vs 20%).The bars represent the means of every condition. The within subject differences due to synchrony are visualized with floating scales together with their confidence intervals (constructed following [46]). In addition, asterisks mark significant differences.
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pone.0145664.g002: Means and differences with 95% Confidence Intervals of trustworthiness judgments according to type of stroking (synchrony vs asynchrony), order (Synchrony first vs Asynchrony first) and Morphing (100% vs 35% vs 20%).The bars represent the means of every condition. The within subject differences due to synchrony are visualized with floating scales together with their confidence intervals (constructed following [46]). In addition, asterisks mark significant differences.

Mentions: When asynchronous stroking took place before the synchronous manipulation, there were no significant differences between synchronous strangers’ faces (M = 2.75, SD = 1.20) and asynchronous strangers’ faces (M = 3.00, SD = 1.43), F < 1. The same also occurred for the 35% morphs (Synchrony: M = 4.66, SD = 1.21; Asynchrony: M = 4.67, SD = 1.30), F < 1, and 20% morphs (Synchrony: M = 4.56, SD = 1.09; Asynchrony: M = 4.62, SD = 1.13), F < 1. Fig 2summarizes the results.


Judged and Remembered Trustworthiness of Faces Is Enhanced by Experiencing Multisensory Synchrony and Asynchrony in the Right Order.

Toscano H, Schubert TW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Means and differences with 95% Confidence Intervals of trustworthiness judgments according to type of stroking (synchrony vs asynchrony), order (Synchrony first vs Asynchrony first) and Morphing (100% vs 35% vs 20%).The bars represent the means of every condition. The within subject differences due to synchrony are visualized with floating scales together with their confidence intervals (constructed following [46]). In addition, asterisks mark significant differences.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696736&req=5

pone.0145664.g002: Means and differences with 95% Confidence Intervals of trustworthiness judgments according to type of stroking (synchrony vs asynchrony), order (Synchrony first vs Asynchrony first) and Morphing (100% vs 35% vs 20%).The bars represent the means of every condition. The within subject differences due to synchrony are visualized with floating scales together with their confidence intervals (constructed following [46]). In addition, asterisks mark significant differences.
Mentions: When asynchronous stroking took place before the synchronous manipulation, there were no significant differences between synchronous strangers’ faces (M = 2.75, SD = 1.20) and asynchronous strangers’ faces (M = 3.00, SD = 1.43), F < 1. The same also occurred for the 35% morphs (Synchrony: M = 4.66, SD = 1.21; Asynchrony: M = 4.67, SD = 1.30), F < 1, and 20% morphs (Synchrony: M = 4.56, SD = 1.09; Asynchrony: M = 4.62, SD = 1.13), F < 1. Fig 2summarizes the results.

Bottom Line: This work builds on the enfacement effect.This typically leads to cognitive and social-cognitive effects similar to self-other merging.The results of both studies show that order of stroking creates a context in which multisensory synchrony can affect the trustworthiness of faces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Centro de Investigação e Intervenção Social, Lisboa, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This work builds on the enfacement effect. This effect occurs when experiencing a rhythmic stimulation on one's cheek while seeing someone else's face being touched in a synchronous way. This typically leads to cognitive and social-cognitive effects similar to self-other merging. In two studies, we demonstrate that this multisensory stimulation can change the evaluation of the other's face. In the first study, participants judged the stranger's face and similar faces as being more trustworthy after synchrony, but not after asynchrony. Synchrony interacted with the order of the stroking; hence trustworthiness only changed when the synchronous stimulation occurred before the asynchronous one. In the second study, a synchronous stimulation caused participants to remember the stranger's face as more trustworthy, but again only when the synchronous stimulation came before the asynchronous one. The results of both studies show that order of stroking creates a context in which multisensory synchrony can affect the trustworthiness of faces.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus