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Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient.

Siebrasse EA, Nguyen NL, Willby MJ, Erdman DD, Menegus MA, Wang D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2016)

Bottom Line: WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry.A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages.Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) was detected in a bone marrow transplant recipient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who died in 2001. Crystalline lattices of polyomavirus-like particles were observed in the patient's lung by electron microscopy. WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry. A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages. Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemical detection of WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 in respiratory tract of a child with fatal acute respiratory illness. Human lung tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with a monoclonal antibody against WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 (designated NN-Ab06) (A, C) or an isotype control antibody (B, D). Human tracheal tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with NN-Ab06 (E) or an isotype control antibody (F). The middle panels show insets from panels A, C, and E (dotted boxes) at higher original magnifications (×600).
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Figure 2: Immunohistochemical detection of WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 in respiratory tract of a child with fatal acute respiratory illness. Human lung tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with a monoclonal antibody against WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 (designated NN-Ab06) (A, C) or an isotype control antibody (B, D). Human tracheal tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with NN-Ab06 (E) or an isotype control antibody (F). The middle panels show insets from panels A, C, and E (dotted boxes) at higher original magnifications (×600).

Mentions: After detection of WUPyV in the patient’s tissues by real-time qPCR, WUPyV-specific IHC with a previously described assay (11) was performed on available tissues (lung, liver, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract) to determine whether WU-VP1 antigen was also present (Figure 2). Liver, kidney, and gastrointestinal tissues were all negative (Table 2). Staining was observed in the lung (Figure 2, panels A, C) and the trachea (Figure 2, panel E), but no staining was observed in serial sections stained with an isotype control antibody (Figure 2, panels B, D, F). Serial sections stained with no primary or secondary antibodies were also negative (not shown). Overall, we saw 3 patterns of staining in the lung. In some cells, WU-VP1 staining was primarily in the nucleus. In others, the perimeter of the nucleus was strongly positive. And in others, the staining was diffuse, making it difficult to discern its position within cells. Of note, the tracheal staining was within a submucosal gland, where WUPyV tropism has not been previously described.


Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient.

Siebrasse EA, Nguyen NL, Willby MJ, Erdman DD, Menegus MA, Wang D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2016)

Immunohistochemical detection of WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 in respiratory tract of a child with fatal acute respiratory illness. Human lung tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with a monoclonal antibody against WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 (designated NN-Ab06) (A, C) or an isotype control antibody (B, D). Human tracheal tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with NN-Ab06 (E) or an isotype control antibody (F). The middle panels show insets from panels A, C, and E (dotted boxes) at higher original magnifications (×600).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696717&req=5

Figure 2: Immunohistochemical detection of WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 in respiratory tract of a child with fatal acute respiratory illness. Human lung tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with a monoclonal antibody against WU polyomavirus viral protein 1 (designated NN-Ab06) (A, C) or an isotype control antibody (B, D). Human tracheal tissue at original magnification of ×200, stained with NN-Ab06 (E) or an isotype control antibody (F). The middle panels show insets from panels A, C, and E (dotted boxes) at higher original magnifications (×600).
Mentions: After detection of WUPyV in the patient’s tissues by real-time qPCR, WUPyV-specific IHC with a previously described assay (11) was performed on available tissues (lung, liver, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract) to determine whether WU-VP1 antigen was also present (Figure 2). Liver, kidney, and gastrointestinal tissues were all negative (Table 2). Staining was observed in the lung (Figure 2, panels A, C) and the trachea (Figure 2, panel E), but no staining was observed in serial sections stained with an isotype control antibody (Figure 2, panels B, D, F). Serial sections stained with no primary or secondary antibodies were also negative (not shown). Overall, we saw 3 patterns of staining in the lung. In some cells, WU-VP1 staining was primarily in the nucleus. In others, the perimeter of the nucleus was strongly positive. And in others, the staining was diffuse, making it difficult to discern its position within cells. Of note, the tracheal staining was within a submucosal gland, where WUPyV tropism has not been previously described.

Bottom Line: WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry.A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages.Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) was detected in a bone marrow transplant recipient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who died in 2001. Crystalline lattices of polyomavirus-like particles were observed in the patient's lung by electron microscopy. WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry. A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages. Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus