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Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia.

Assiri A, Abedi GR, Bin Saeed AA, Abdalla MA, al-Masry M, Choudhry AJ, Lu X, Erdman DD, Tatti K, Binder AM, Rudd J, Tokars J, Miao C, Alarbash H, Nooh R, Pallansch M, Gerber SI, Watson JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2016)

Bottom Line: Fifteen patients, including 4 HCP, were associated with 1 dialysis unit.Similar gene sequences among patients unlinked by time or location suggest unrecognized viral transmission.Circulation persisted in multiple healthcare settings over an extended period, underscoring the importance of strengthening MERS-CoV surveillance and infection-control practices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel respiratory pathogen first reported in 2012. During September 2014-January 2015, an outbreak of 38 cases of MERS was reported from 4 healthcare facilities in Taif, Saudi Arabia; 21 of the 38 case-patients died. Clinical and public health records showed that 13 patients were healthcare personnel (HCP). Fifteen patients, including 4 HCP, were associated with 1 dialysis unit. Three additional HCP in this dialysis unit had serologic evidence of MERS-CoV infection. Viral RNA was amplified from acute-phase serum specimens of 15 patients, and full spike gene-coding sequencing was obtained from 10 patients who formed a discrete cluster; sequences from specimens of 9 patients were closely related. Similar gene sequences among patients unlinked by time or location suggest unrecognized viral transmission. Circulation persisted in multiple healthcare settings over an extended period, underscoring the importance of strengthening MERS-CoV surveillance and infection-control practices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) case-patients reported in Taif, Saudi Arabia, during September 2014–January 2015. Indicated are time of symptom onset or first positive laboratory testing. Healthcare setting where transmission likely occurred is shown by color. Circles indicate healthcare personnel (HCP), squares non-HCP; black outlines indicate that patient died. Asterisks (*) indicate that sequencing was performed on the patient’s serum sample.
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Figure 1: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) case-patients reported in Taif, Saudi Arabia, during September 2014–January 2015. Indicated are time of symptom onset or first positive laboratory testing. Healthcare setting where transmission likely occurred is shown by color. Circles indicate healthcare personnel (HCP), squares non-HCP; black outlines indicate that patient died. Asterisks (*) indicate that sequencing was performed on the patient’s serum sample.

Mentions: During August 1, 2014–February 1, 2015, the MoH received reports of 38 patients with laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV (Figure 1). Twenty-eight (74%) were men, 22 (58%) were of Saudi nationality, and median age was 51 (range 17–84) years (Table 1). Thirteen (34%) patients were HCP: 7 nurses, 2 physicians, 2 cleaning personnel, 1 administrative professional, and 1 clerk. The most common underlying medical conditions were diabetes, reported by 16 (47%), and renal failure requiring dialysis, reported by 12 (33%). At illness onset, 35 (92%) patients reported >1 respiratory symptom. Two patients, both HCP identified through routine testing of contacts of previously identified patients, reported no symptoms (Table 1).


Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia.

Assiri A, Abedi GR, Bin Saeed AA, Abdalla MA, al-Masry M, Choudhry AJ, Lu X, Erdman DD, Tatti K, Binder AM, Rudd J, Tokars J, Miao C, Alarbash H, Nooh R, Pallansch M, Gerber SI, Watson JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2016)

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) case-patients reported in Taif, Saudi Arabia, during September 2014–January 2015. Indicated are time of symptom onset or first positive laboratory testing. Healthcare setting where transmission likely occurred is shown by color. Circles indicate healthcare personnel (HCP), squares non-HCP; black outlines indicate that patient died. Asterisks (*) indicate that sequencing was performed on the patient’s serum sample.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696715&req=5

Figure 1: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) case-patients reported in Taif, Saudi Arabia, during September 2014–January 2015. Indicated are time of symptom onset or first positive laboratory testing. Healthcare setting where transmission likely occurred is shown by color. Circles indicate healthcare personnel (HCP), squares non-HCP; black outlines indicate that patient died. Asterisks (*) indicate that sequencing was performed on the patient’s serum sample.
Mentions: During August 1, 2014–February 1, 2015, the MoH received reports of 38 patients with laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV (Figure 1). Twenty-eight (74%) were men, 22 (58%) were of Saudi nationality, and median age was 51 (range 17–84) years (Table 1). Thirteen (34%) patients were HCP: 7 nurses, 2 physicians, 2 cleaning personnel, 1 administrative professional, and 1 clerk. The most common underlying medical conditions were diabetes, reported by 16 (47%), and renal failure requiring dialysis, reported by 12 (33%). At illness onset, 35 (92%) patients reported >1 respiratory symptom. Two patients, both HCP identified through routine testing of contacts of previously identified patients, reported no symptoms (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Fifteen patients, including 4 HCP, were associated with 1 dialysis unit.Similar gene sequences among patients unlinked by time or location suggest unrecognized viral transmission.Circulation persisted in multiple healthcare settings over an extended period, underscoring the importance of strengthening MERS-CoV surveillance and infection-control practices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel respiratory pathogen first reported in 2012. During September 2014-January 2015, an outbreak of 38 cases of MERS was reported from 4 healthcare facilities in Taif, Saudi Arabia; 21 of the 38 case-patients died. Clinical and public health records showed that 13 patients were healthcare personnel (HCP). Fifteen patients, including 4 HCP, were associated with 1 dialysis unit. Three additional HCP in this dialysis unit had serologic evidence of MERS-CoV infection. Viral RNA was amplified from acute-phase serum specimens of 15 patients, and full spike gene-coding sequencing was obtained from 10 patients who formed a discrete cluster; sequences from specimens of 9 patients were closely related. Similar gene sequences among patients unlinked by time or location suggest unrecognized viral transmission. Circulation persisted in multiple healthcare settings over an extended period, underscoring the importance of strengthening MERS-CoV surveillance and infection-control practices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus